Navy Marine Recruiter

Marine Recruiter 1941 10
Marine Recruiter 1941 10
Vol. I No. 3 ....... Cover: This month's cover photograph is the work of the George Moulin Studios, San Francisco. It shows Sergeant Herbert H. Knott, of the San Francisco District Headquarters Station, greeting a prospective recruit on Yerba Island, midway between San Francisco and Oakland. The splendid view is an excellent piece of photographic art and shows the famous San Francisco skyline and the western portion of the eight-mile long San Francisco Bay bridge. Yerba Island, former home of the United States Naval Training Station on the Pacific Coast, is now the home of the Marine Detachment, Receiving Ship, at San Francisco and adjoins Treasure Island, site of the Golden Gate Exposition, which is being converted into the United States Navy Patrol Force Headquarters and Section base.

Marine Recruiter 1941 12
Marine Recruiter 1941 12
Vol. I No. 5 ....... Cover: Artwork by Kres and Joe Richards

Marine Recruiter 1942 01
Marine Recruiter 1942 01
Vol. II No. 1 ....... This month the Marine Recruiter staff salutes the Central Recruiting Division with the cover photograph. With the Chicago skyline in the background two members of the Dick Stone League discuss recruiting with Quartermaster Sergeant R. J. (Dick) Stone of Central Recruiting Division Headquarters and First Sergeant Benjamin F. Rippy of the Chicago District. Left to right, the Marines on the cover are Theodore Levin, past commander, Marine Post 273, American Legion, First Sergeant Rippy, Captain Arthur J. Murphy, formerly with the 97th Company, Sixth Regiment, and Quartermaster Sergeant Stone. Levin and Murphy now are Chicago attorneys.

Marine Recruiter 1942 02
Marine Recruiter 1942 02
Vol. II No. 2 ....... Cover: No stranger to Marine recruiters is blue-blooded "Buddy," English bulldog mascot of the Cleveland District Headquarters Station. Pictures of Buddy's presentation were published in the January issue of the Marine Recruiter. The cover photograph was taken by a Cleveland, Ohio, Press staff photographer. That's a chrome-plated Marine Corps helmet Buddy is wearing. Buddy was only six weeks old when the picture was snapped and filling the helmet bored him a bit. Buddy, owned by Sgt. Charles L. "Stoney" Craig, is a son of Vardona Lord George Again, national Champion in the best of breed class of the American Kennel Club. Since the publication of the picture on the Marine Recruiter cover in the nation's press, the Cleveland office has had numerous offers to purchase Buddy. Some offers were as high as $150.

Marine Recruiter 1942 03
Marine Recruiter 1942 03
Vol. II No. 3 ....... Cover: The cover photograph of the March Marine Recruiter was taken by Harry Horsfall of North Adams, Mass. Just to prove the editors of the Marine Recruiter were not alone in selecting it as a good photograph, we might state that the photograph previously had been awarded first prize in a contest conducted by the Massachusetts Committee on Public Safety for Civilian Defense subjects. The "Post Office Patriots" are Francis and Bernard Adams of North Adams, Mass

Marine Recruiter 1942 04
Marine Recruiter 1942 04
Vol. II No. 4 ....... Cover: Mother's Day is the second Sunday in May, but the photograph on our cover so struck our fancy when it appeared in the Grants Pass, Ore., Daily Courier that we sat down and dashed off a request to Publisher A. E. Voorhies. Publisher Voorhies not only sent us the photograph for the cover, but he also mailed us the picture on page three which ties in with the story we have to relate. The story was told briefly in the February issue of the Marine Recruiter, but merits retelling in order to record details and later developments in the lives of the principles. On Sunday evening, December 21, 1941, Mrs. Lulu J. Griffith of Grants Pass received a telegram from The Commandant of the Marine Corps stating that her son, Sgt. John A. Wright, had been killed in action in the Pacific. Sgt. Wright had been stationed at Salem, Ore., on recruiting duty. On December 9, following the outbreak of the war, he wrote his mother that his Christmas leave had been cancelled and that he might be called to action. The Grants Pass Daily Courier published the story along with our picture on page three under the caption, "First Grants Pass Boy Killed in Present War." As soon as Sgt. Wright heard the report of his death, he wired his mother that he was very much alive and doing a brisk recruiting business in Oregon's Willamette Valley. It was a case of wrong identification, the Navy Department wired.

Marine Recruiter 1942 05
Marine Recruiter 1942 05
Vol. II No. 5 ....... Cover: The cover photograph of this month's Marine Recruiter appeared in the Nashville, Tenn., Banner and is the work of Hilliard Wood, staff photographer for that newspaper. Posting a Marine Corps Family sticker in the window of her home is Mrs. Floyd D. Brantley of Nashville. Her son, William Joseph Brantley, 20, enlisted at Nashville February 2 and received his recruit training at Parris Island. Another son, Floyd Brantley, Jr., had planned to go with his brother to serve in the Marine Corps, but was rejected because of an eye defect. Although the brothers were disappointed because they were not able to serve together, William went on anyway. The little girl helping Mrs. Brantley paste up the sticker is Nancy Ruth Myatt, two-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Myatt, neighbors of Mr. and Mrs. Brantley.

Marine Recruiter 1942 06
Marine Recruiter 1942 06
Vol. II No. 6 ....... Cover: The cover photograph of this month's Marine Recruiter was taken by a staff photographer of the Little Rock, Ark., Gazette. Occasion for the picture was the opening of the Community Day School of Little Rock on war time. Present at the opening were Sgts. Jay P. Wade and James A. Earles who demonstrated the proper way to salute the flag. At the conclusion of the demonstration Sgt. Wade offered Gwendolyn Neser one of the Marine Corps Publicity Bureau's "Our Flag" booklets. Gwendolyn wanted the booklet, but when she came in close proximity of Sgt. Wade she decided his marksmanship medals were more interesting.

Marine Recruiter 1942 07
Marine Recruiter 1942 07
Vol. II No. 7 ....... Cover: During the past month Marine Corps recruiting stations everywhere collected magazines and other reading material for distribution to Leatherneck bases throughout the world. In some sections recruiters had to call a halt to the donations. There were more magazines and books than could be cared for properly. On our cover is Sgt. Alfred J. Gagne adding more magazines to a Stack that should keep Devil Dogs somewhere up to the minute on current magazine fiction and non-fiction. Sgt. Gagne is attached to the Minneapolis, Minn., District Headquarters staff, but spends his time hunting applicants in St. Paul. His picture appeared in the St. Paul Dispatch and was forwarded to the Marine Recruiter by A. Smalley, a civilian recruiter of the Dispatch Pioneer Press Company of St. Paul.

Marine Recruiter 1942 08
Marine Recruiter 1942 08
Vol. II No. 8 ....... Cover: This month's cover photograph appeared in the Chillicothe, Ohio, Gazette and shows Stf. Sgt. Herschel R. Beville saluting the first American flag flown over Hawaii. The flag is displayed from the Ross County Historical Society Museum in Chillicothe. It was used August 12, 1898, in the ceremony annexing the group of islands to the United States. United States Marines were present. According to the Chillicothe Gazette, "The flag, which has only 44 stars, was given to the Rev. Thomas Garvin, a missionary to the island, who was praised on this occasion by U. S. Commissioner Blount, the latter stating that the Rev. Mr. Garvin more than any other man was responsible for the acquisition of the territory by the United States.

Marine Recruiter 1942 09
Marine Recruiter 1942 09
Vol. II No. 9 ....... Cover: The cover for this month's Marine Recruiter is a reproduction of an oil painting which appears on the newest A-sign released by the Recruiting Publicity Bureau. The painting was done by Capt. William H. V. Gunnis of the Art Section of the Publicity Bureau.

Marine Recruiter 1942 11
Marine Recruiter 1942 11
Vol. II No. 11 ....... Cover: The cover for this issue of the Marine Recruiter was designed by Mr. William E. Nast, 176 Woodcliff Road, Newton Highlands, Mass. The design was sent to Brig. Gen. Robert L. Denig and forwarded to the Recruiter for use as a cover.

Marine Recruiter 1942 12
Marine Recruiter 1942 12
Vol. II No. 12 ....... Cover: The original of the pen and wash drawing appearing on this month's front cover was done in three colors by Stf. Sgt. Frederick S. Thomas, who is a member of the Art Department at the Depot of Supplies, Phila., Pa. The drawing symbolizes the activities of the knights of old and their seven crusades to free the Holy Land from its oppressors. At Christmas time, this year. Marines everywhere are carrying on the eighth crusade to once again make the world a free place in which to live.

Marine Recruiter 1943 01
Marine Recruiter 1943 01
Vol. 3 No. 1 ....... Cover: The front cover of the January Recruiter is frorn an original paintmg by Capt. William H. V. Guinness, head of fhe Marine Publicity Art Department. The painting was inspired after the Marines landed on fhe Solomons and was used on one of the later A-signs under the headline of "Let 'Em Have lt."

Marine Recruiter 1943 03
Marine Recruiter 1943 03
Vol. 3 No. 2 ....... Cover: Marine Corps Women's Reserve

Marine Recruiter 1943 04
Marine Recruiter 1943 04
Vol. 3 No. 4 ....... Cover: This month's front cover shows Earle Vincent Swift, age 6, arrayed in his newest uniform which is complete to the last detail. His Marine father, Earle, Sr., is a photographer for the Recruiting Publicity Bureau.

Marine Recruiter 1943 05
Marine Recruiter 1943 05
Vol. 3 No. 5 ....... Cover: This month's front cover was designed by MT. Sgt. Paul Woyshner of the Marine Publicity Bureau Art Department. It shows the detail of the new Women's Reserve postage stamp size stickers . . . now available at the Publicity Bureau in Philadelphia.

Marine Recruiter 1943 06
Marine Recruiter 1943 06
Vol. 3 No. 6 ....... We are indebted to the Tennessee Eastman Corp for the photograph appearing on our cover. The original of this hung for some weeks on the wall of the Recruiter office and received much favorable comment. One veteran officer summarized the appeal of this print by stating "That's a complete Marine story-the emblem, a square jaw-and the breach of a Springfield."

Marine Recruiter 1943 07
Marine Recruiter 1943 07
Vol. 3 No. 7 ....... Cover: As the cover so expressively depicts, this issue marks the second anniversary of the Marine Recruiter. Together with our readers, we have observed marked changes throughout the Corps during our publishing existence. These changes have, without exception, been in the form of progress toward the largest, most effective Marine Corps in all history. Humbly enough, we hope our contributions toward that objective have been of Service to you - our readers and supporters.




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