United States Military Air Fields, Camps, Forts and Stations
Military Air Fields, Camps, Forts and Stations

A Camera Trip Through Chico Army Air Field
"A Camera Trip Through Chico Army Air Field.pdf"
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Aberdeen - A Camera Trip Through Aberdeen Proving Ground
Aberdeen - A Camera Trip Through Aberdeen Proving Ground
Click on Image for story of Aberdeen Proving Ground

Alamogordo Army Air Base
Alamogordo Army Air Base
Detailed updates coming

Aloe Army Air Field - A Camera Trip Through Aloe Army Air Field
Aloe Army Air Field - A Camera Trip Through Aloe Army Air Field
Detailed updates coming

Amarillo - A Camera Trip Through Amarillo Army Air Field
Amarillo - A Camera Trip Through Amarillo Army Air Field
Amarillo Army Field is located ten miles east of the city of Amarillo, deep in the Panhandle of Texas. Ground for the field was broken on April 20, 1942, and on May 26, the War Department designated the new installation as Amarillo Field. Since the field was built on a typical barren plain, great care has been taken to enhance its living conditions. More than 25,000 trees, shrubs and bulbs have been planted and carefully nurtured, and in addition a systematic program of soil-erosion prevention has been established and elimination of dust during the windy season has been accomplished by sowing the entire area with native grasses. The first large contingent of permanent party men arrived on the field on September 2 and the first group of potential students arrived the following day. These students entered upon their course of study on September 7. The field was officially opened to the public on Armistice Day, November 11, and a crowd of Panhandle citizens estimated to number 40,000, visited the technical school to view the various phases of the school's training program. The official name of the field was changed on December 2, to Amarillo Army Air Field. On December 23, the first class of students were graduated from the field. Late in May, a new activity was added to the field with the assumption of basic training. This branch of training has grown to be one of the major activities of the field and has as its mission, the education of Army air personnel in the fundamentals of soldiering; so now in addition to supplying thousands of mechanics, it teaches new men the basic fundamentals of warfare in its training center. Regardless of their duties here or in the various theatres of war, the men of Amarillo Army Air Field have the same goal in mind - they intend to "keep 'em flying"!

Barksdale Field - A Camera Trip Through Barksdale Field
Barksdale Field - A Camera Trip Through Barksdale Field
The History of Barksdale Field ....... In Peacetime and wartime Barksdale Field has played on important part in the combat training program of the Army Air Forces. Located four miles southeast of Shreveport, Louisiana, the field was dedicated February 2, 1933, and from then until 1942 it was the world's largest air base. It was named for Lieutenant Eugene Hoy Barksdale, World War I flyer from Mississippi who lost his life August 11,1926, while flight-testing an Army plane near Wright Field, Dayton, Ohio. Barksdale covers 26,886 acres of land five miles wide and nine and one-half miles long donated by the City of Shreveport, which expended a bond issue of $1,650,000 for its purchase from 800 owners. Suiting the architecture to the locality, French Colonial design was employed and a year after construction was started, in March 1931, one of the most beautiful Army installations in the nation rose from the cotton plantations. Before dedication of the field $3,500,000 had been invested, subsequent peacetime and wartime improvements revising this figure upward. Following arrival of the 20th Pursuit Group from Mather Field, California, late in 1932, aerial activity increased through the years until it reached its zenith during World War II with the training of combat crews. In 1935 the Third Attack Group was assigned to the field and combat activities were placed under the Third Wing of the GHQ Air Force, with the base planes organized to fly to any point in the nation within a few hours in the event of any emergency. Outbreak of war in Europe in 1939 was followed by rapid expansion of Barksdale's training facilities and replacement of some of the pursuit and attack units by light bombardment crews, the 20th Pursuit Group moving to California early in 1940. Navigation, single-engine pilot, twin-engine pilot and bombardier schools were added, but after the attack on Pearl Harbor December 7, 1941, the schools were transferred and the field returned to the combat command, training bombardment crews for their part in the AAF'S global warfare. First base commander was Major Millard F. Harmon (Lt. Gen. Harmon, former AAF chief of staff and AAF leader in the Solomons campaign), who arrived on July 1, 1932. Other distinguished commanding officers from the field's dedication until World War II have included: Major Gen. Gerald C. Brant, former AAF commander in Newfoundland;, Major Gen. Lewis H. Brereton, World War II commander of the AAF in China, India, Burma and the Middle East; Col. Charles T. Phillips, missing in action in the North African campaign; Col. Robert E. M. Goolrick, Col. Ira A. Rader and Col. William B. Wright, Jr. Barksdale Field is ideally equipped to meet the spiritual and physical needs of personnel stationed here, with its splendid non-sectarian chapel, hospital and recreational opportunities. Hangar 9, focal point of off-duty-hour activities, has ten bowling alleys, a gymnasium, long-distance telephone exchange, and in this building are held the weekly boxing cards, as well as numerous dances and shows. A golf course, recently enlarged to 18 holes, swimming pools for officers and enlisted men, volley ball courts and Softball diamonds offer ample facilities for outdoor athletics.

Bergstrom Field Austin Texas Booklet Troop Carrier
Bergstrom Field Austin Texas Booklet Troop Carrier
Detailed updates coming

Bowman Field - A Camera Trip Through Bowman Field
Bowman Field - A Camera Trip Through Bowman Field
Detailed updates coming

Buckingham Army Air Field - Fort Myers, Florida
Buckingham Army Air Field - Fort Myers, Florida
History of Buckingham Field ....... Fort Myers, Fla. . . . A waste of palmetto thickets, dead pine trees, stumps, sand and swamp ten miles east of Fort Myers, Fla., has in a year become the foremost aerial gunnery school operated by the Army Air Forces. For today at Buckingham Field thousands of gunners are being trained to shoot the Zeros and Messerschmidts out of the skies. Last May a few cattle lazily roamed over this land; now this sandy waste is alive with the clatter of machine guns and the roar of airplane motors. On May 5, 1942, Major Richard W. Duggan, then a captain, arrived in Fort Myers and set up his offices in the Collier Arcade. A few days before he had flown over the waste land that was later to become Buckingham Field. Furniture for the office was borrowed from local business men. Edward Allen, accountant, lent a typewriter and desk and Harry McWhorter and Harry Wood, real estate men, both gave a desk. Police Chief Charles Moore arranged parking space for the office and the city and county officials gave numerous maps and other office equipment to help the new gunnery school. Four days after Major Duggan arrived, Col. Delmar T. Spivey arrived from Maxwell Field where he had been serving as project officer for the field for some time. Four days later the colonel received the news that he had been made a full colonel, and the celebrants were Major Duggan and Mrs. Spivey. He plunged into the thousand and one details connected with the activation of a new post. Colonel Spivey's gracious smile and Major Duggan's ingratiating manner got the school off to a flying start. When the officers and enlisted men began to pour in, the local real estate agents were prepared to handle the crowd, and although living here has not been always "just like home," the majority of Army families in Fort Myers have found excellent accommodations, as compared with the hovels available at many other stations. The actual construction of the field began May 25, and the buildings were divided into two classes; those to be finished within a 75-day period and others which were to be completed within 110 days. At the peak of the work, 3,000 to 3,500 men were employed on the post, and a majority of the buildings were in serviceable condition when troops began to arrive. The formal activation of the post came on July 5. Thus a separate entity was born for the avowed purpose of defeating our enemies. Training began September 5th, and now graduates of this school are fighting the Japs and Germans in widely separated parts of the earth. The gunnery program is essentially the same as at first, but numerous improvements and refinements have been made in the nine months since training began. Thousands of men have been graduated since the first class received their gunner's wings early in October. The operation of the post was guided through these difficult days by Col. Spivey; he remained in command of Buckingham Field until March 23 when he left to become A-3 of the Training Center. He was succeeded by Col. W. D. Jenkins, until then the head of the Central Instructor's School. Both Colonel Jenkins and Colonel Spivey left in mid-July for a mission to European Combat theaters. They were subsequently reported missing in action and are now known to be prisoners of war in Germany. Colonel L. P. Hickey became the commanding officer in August, shortly after his return from Sicily. ..... 36 pages

Camp Abbot Panoram
Camp Abbot Panoram
Detailed updates coming

Camp Atterbury - A Camera Trip Through Camp Atterbury
Camp Atterbury - A Camera Trip Through Camp Atterbury
Covering over 40,000 acres, Camp Atterbury, located 30 miles south of Indianapolis, is Indiana's newest and largest training camp. It is named after Gen. W. W. Atterbury, who was Director of Transportation of the A.E.F. in World War I, and president of the Pennsylvania Railroad System. The first officers came here in June, 1942, and the first large-scale movement of military personnel into camp was in July. The following pages show a part of the training the soldier receives at Camp Atterbury, and the many activities in which he participates during that important process. Although the training is intensive, many installations in the Camp are devoted to recreational, athletic and religious activities, for the soldiers' happiness and well-being. The soldiers' stay at Camp Atterbury is a busy, all-important one, as these pictures of their life here will show.

Camp Barkeley - A Camera Trip Through Camp Barkeley, Texas
Camp Barkeley - A Camera Trip Through Camp Barkeley, Texas
The History of Camp Barkeley ....... Originally planned as a temporary tent camp to house an infantry division and necessary service of supply troops, Camp Barkeley, located nine miles southwest of Abilene, Texas, today is one of the largest military establishments in Texas. First war department announcements of plans to build the camp placed the estimated cost at less than $4,000,000, but subsequent expansions and conversion from a temporary tent camp to a cantoriment of hutments have boosted the overall construction expenditures to some $25,000,000. The camp was officially accepted by the army from the constructing quartermaster on February 15, 1941. Early in January of 1941 the War Department announced that the Camp had been named Camp Barkeley in honor of a young San Antonio soldier-hero of World War I, one David Barkeley. The camp is one of the only two in the nation named in honor of an enlisted man. Young Berkeley lost his life in the Meuse-Argonne forest on a daring, voluntary mission behind enemy lines. For this heroic act he wos posthumously aworded the Congressionel Medol of Honor end his body now rests in the Stote's most secred spot the Alomo Cemetery. First major expansion was authorized in August of 1941 with the letting of contracts for building facilities for a 4000-man Medical Replacement Training Center. This was completed by December 1 , on time for scheduled activation of the MRTC on that date. Since activation, the MRTC has been greatly enlarged and although naturally a military secret, its strength today has grown tremendously. Another expansion in 1 942 was building of facilities for the Medical Administrative Corps' officer candidate school, activated early in May, 1942. The OCS at Barkeley now is the only school of its kind operated by the Medical Administrative Corps. While the original division which trained at Camp Barkeley has long since gone to other scenes, another has replaced it, and is now receiving the training that modern warfare demands. Here infantry end artillery, along with engineers, ordnance, signal, medical, quartermaster, and other groups, are coordinated into an outfit that is rightfully proud of the insignio it wears. In addition there are a number of other units, principally medical and QM, in training at Camp Barkeley. The Camp is a city within itself, boasting every facility essential to a modern army camp. It has a 2300-bed hospital, adequate storehouse storage space, two large cold storage plants, a bpkery, a bonk, four lorge theoters, two enlisted men's service clubs, 1 1 chapels and some 35 post exchange buildings. All military personnel at Barkeley are now housed in hutments except for the 4000 occupying the only 64-man barracks on the post. This is truly a busy post and these pictures show in some part the life of a soldier here at Barkeley. Although there is much work from sun-up to sun-down, from the start of the week to its end, there is also ample opportunity for relaxation and recreation. Just as in civilian life, after work, a man can find opportunities for playing games, indulging in sports, reading in fine libraries or lolling in the Service Club. It's on interesting life to say the least end certainly leaves few unoccupied moments in the daily routine.

Camp Barkeley - Medical Replacement Training Center Camp Barkeley, Texas
Camp Barkeley - Medical Replacement Training Center Camp Barkeley, Texas
A Medical Soldier Trains ....... Located on the rolling plains of central West Texas, near the City of Abilene, this largest Medical Replacement Training Center in the world has been turning out top-notch medical soldiers since it opened in December, 1941. This is one of the most vital activities of the Medical Department, Army Service Forces. Commanding the MRTC is Brig. Gen. Roy C. Heflebower, veteran medical officer. The modern medical soldier must be rugged and in tip-top physical condition. He must be able to assimilate and retain the teachings of his instructors. He must be a tactician, able to think and act on the split second that may be the difference between life and death for both himself and his patient. The medic must be fearless, with the courage to go out on the field of battle unarmed, to give "service above self" in the tradition of the Medical Department. It is in striving towards these and many other ends that the trainee spends his time in class and out in the field at the Medical Replacement Training Center. The accent in MRTC is on physical conditioning, rigorous road marches of the "Commando Training" type, daily exercises to develop neglected muscles. This is besides the classes that include such subjects as military courtesy, chemical warfare, anatomy and physiology, organization of the Army, communications, map reading, sanitation, logistics (movement of troops and supply), and "first aid" treatment. All these and more are woven into the program, and at the same time, the trainee is kept in touch with what is going on in the world through lectures and sound training films on current events and actual war scenes. He has at least an hour of drill a day, at least four or five marches a week, starting out at four miles in two hours and speeding up to four miles in 45 minutes (halts included) on the short hikes, and nine miles in two hours, 16 miles in four hours, and 25 miles in eight hours on the longer jaunts. That's the schedule, and they do it, toting packs weighing upwards of 45 pounds. Then there are night problems, setting up and camouflaging medical installations at night, seeking out, treating and transporting patients by litter in the stygian blackness, under simulated battle conditions. There are two exacting obstacle courses, one negotiated on foot with full pack, and the other by litter teams carrying patients through a maze of barriers, and a hasty entrenchment area where the trainee learns to increase his speed in diving into a trench, fox-hole or other cover from air or ground attacks. Trainees are given a rigid course in "Hand-to-Hand Combat," to protect themselves in case of personal attack, and they become accustomed to gun-fire by negotiating the infiltration course, crawling 120 yards on their stomachs with 30-calibre machinegun bullets whizzing inches overhead. "Acid test" for the trainee, besides the tests he has received and been graded on in his daily classroom and field work, is the bivouac near the end of his training period. Equipped with full packs, the trainees hike 16 miles out to the bivouac area and live and operate under simulated battle conditions. They sleep under camouflage, walk under camouflage and set up their medical installations under camouflage. Here every phase of their basic training is brought into play in a "mock-battle". Somewhere, sometime, probably as long ago as World War I, someone remarked that the medical soldier had a "soft touch", they called him a "pill-roller" and scoffed because he handed no firearms. The utterance had its inevitable echo, and it was still in existence at the start of this war. Soldiers carrying arms were still mocking the medic, but it is fast diminishing, since Pear! Harbor, since Bataan, Corregidor, Guadalcanal, New Guinea, Tunisia, Sicily, Italy, and all along the battle line. Reports have found their way back from the fronts, from experienced medical officers, infantry and field artillery officers, men of the Air Corps, from casual observers and direct quotations from experienced foreign correspondents, the medics are doing a courageous, splendid job over there. "The medics have done a better job than any department of the army," said Frank Hewlett, United Press war correspondent who was at New Guinea. It's "Little Man, You've Had a Busy Day" in the MRTC, and trainees have learned, among other things, that it takes strength and skill to be a medical soldier in the United States Army.

Camp Beale - Beale Pictorial Vol. 1 No. 1
Camp Beale - Beale Pictorial Vol. 1 No. 1
Detailed updates coming

Camp Blanding, Florida IRTC Handbook
Camp Blanding, Florida IRTC Handbook
Not so many chow calls ago, Camp Blanding was a playground for such wilderness denizens as snakes, egrets, wildcats and the most stylishly assorted group of alligators this side of the Congo. It wasn't until September, 1940, that the Camp began to lose these jungle aspects and assume its present character as training grounds for the development of tough, cagey and alert soldiers. That was the month and year the Florida National Guard selected this area as the site for its summer maneuvers. The rest is history. Camp Blanding mushroomed from an entirely undeveloped wasteland into a tremendous military reservation spanning over 125,000 acres, the fourth largest city in the State of Florida, with the finest beach facilities for the teaching of swimming and for off-duty recreation of any Army post. Today, this modern metropolis of war has its own fire department, hospital, telephone and telegraph service, police force, sewage disposal plants, numerous huge warehouses, a water supply system and a complete railroad organization including roundhouses. Over Blanding's broad sweeps stretch myriad obstacle courses, multi-acted drill and problems areas, firing ranges, modern tactical courses plus a general maneuver area extending miles from the lake-front. Kingsley Lake has everything peacetime vacationers used to travel thousands of miles and spend small fortunes to enjoy. It's yours to take full advantage of, without charge. Camp Blanding is named in honor of Major General Albert E. Blanding, formerly Commanding General of the 31st "Dixie" Division and now chief of Florida's Defense Council.

Camp Breckinridge, Ky
Camp Breckinridge, Ky
History of Camp Breckinridge ....... Camp Breckinridge is situated in the extreme western part of Kentucky, 12 miles from the Ohio River. This entirely modern Army camp, designed primarily for Infantry training, covers 56 square miles of gently rolling, brown clay terrain formerly devoted to agricultural pursuits. The speed with which Camp Breckinridge sprang into existence in 1942 stands as a tribute to Army and civilian engineers. Plans for the camp were outlined at Washington, D.C., in August of 1941. Actual construction began April 1 of the following year. An around-the-clock work schedule was maintained during the early months and within five and one-half months all prime contracts had been filled. On July 1, 1942, the camp was activated and the first cadremen established headquarters in the brick schoolhouse of Boxville, Ky., a community taken over by the government as part of the military reservation. Shortly thereafter headquarters was relocated in new administrative buildings. First of the hundreds of cream-colored frame structures to dot the Kentucky countryside marking the arrival of the new Army camp were hospital facilities, barracks, mess halls, warehouses and office buildings, to be followed by chapels, service clubs, theaters, recreation halls and post exchanges. There are 14 post exchanges (general stores for soldiers), 10 non-denominational chapels, five theatres, three Service Clubs, three guest houses and a field house or gymnasium large enough to enable the playing of three basketball games simultaneously. In reality the camp is very similar to a large city. It includes a spacious hospital, laundry, incinerator, cold storage plant, motor repair shops, sewage disposal plant, five fire stations, all utilities, paved roads and sidewalks, together with other facilities. Camp Breckinridge was named in honor of John Cabell Breckinridge, one of Kentucky's outstanding statesmen of the 19th century. At 35 he was the youngest vice-president in history of United States, presiding over the Senate with conspicuous impartiality. Ironically, a few years later he was caught in the Civil War turmoil and eventually distinguished himself as a Confederate general. Nearest town to Camp Breckinridge is Morganfield, Ky., three miles distant. Henderson, Ky., and Evansville, Ind., 24 and 33 miles away respectively, are the closest large cities.

Camp Butner
Camp Butner
Located at the junction of Person, Granville, and Durham counties in North Carolina, Camp Butner, named after North Carolinian Major General Henry Wolfe Butner of World War I fame, was activated on June 15, 1942. In an area where formerly a peaceful farmhouse was observed here and there, there have been developed facilities needed for the successful transformation of peaceful men into fighting men. Drill fields; obstacle, bayonet and hand grenade courses; the most modern type firing ranges; gas chambers and other training aids were constructed to afford the modern soldier the best training which is possible. Here at this combat training camp, the soldier prepares for battle on terrain that is ideal for training purposes since it varies from flat to rolling ground with adequate vegetation to assist the soldier in performing the art of camouflage. There are many streams which assist the soldier in practicing river crossings. But when the grime and grit, of this training under actual battle conditions, is washed off in the evening, a soldier turns to relaxation and entertainment. One of the favorite haunts of the men are the service clubs. Here they can dance, chat, and sip soft drinks with one of the hostesses who comes from a nearby town. The latest motion pictures are shown in the theatres on the post. But should the soldier want to visit one of the towns, frequent bus schedules are maintained regularly. Today, Camp Butner itself is a modern city complete with theatres, fire houses, post offices, traffic signals, libraries, filling stations, banks, and even rationing boards.

Camp Carson
Camp Carson
This pictorial record of Camp Carson is dedicated to the "Men of Carson," stalwart soldiers highly trained to do their part in the war against the Axis. From the day in January, 1942, when ground was first broken on the camp site, the camp quickly grew on a stretch of rolling Colorado prairie hugging the Rocky mountains. Where cattle grazed and prairie dogs abounded, a city of army buildings sprang up. The new camp was appropriately named after Kit Carson, famous Indian fighter, who hunted and trapped almost on the very site of the camp. In May, 1942, the first camp commander and a group of cadre arrived. More soldiers came in June and on July 15, the old 89th division of World War I was reactivated. At Camp Carson, infantry, pack artillery, hospital and other units receive the best of military training to fit them for the job ahead. At the infirmaries and the huge station hospital they get the best of medical care. Their spiritual needs are met at the 14 chapels where men from every denomination worship. The camp chaplains not only guide them in their religious life but are their sympathetic counselors and friends. For recreation there are three Service clubs, six theaters and a field house. At the Service club the soldiers can relax with friends after a hard day's work, or meet relatives visiting them at camp. There are three guest houses providing overnight accommodations for visitors. The latest Broadway and Hollywood hits are shown at the camp theaters and once a month a USO show, staged by professionals, is offered free to the military personnel. Lively basketball games of the camp league and other indoor athletics are held in the large field house. The 18 post exchanges offer personal items and refreshments at bargain prices. Six miles north of the camp is Colorado Springs, where three USO centers and two war recreation centers, generously supplied by the city of Colorado Springs, provide further recreational facilities. Pike's peak and other beauty spots of the region add to the diversions available for the soldier on leave. Under wise and able leadership Camp Carson energetically and faithfully fulfills its mission in furnishing the best trained soldiers in the world for whatever duty may be theirs in the global conflict.

Camp Chaffee - A Camera Trip Through Camp Chaffee
Camp Chaffee - A Camera Trip Through Camp Chaffee
Detailed updates coming

Camp Claiborne - A Camera Trip Through Camp Claiborne
Camp Claiborne - A Camera Trip Through Camp Claiborne
History of Camp Claiborne ....... Camp Claiborne, one of four large army camps in the central Louisiana area and located about 18 miles from Alexandria, was opened for use about January 15, 1941, construction having been begun the preceding fall. The camp was named for an illustrious early governor of Louisiana and disciple of Thomas Jefferson, William Charles Cole Claiborne. The 1,245.71 acres on which the camp is situated is leased by the War Department, the government holding an option to renew the lease each year until June 30, 1966. Constructed initially as a tent camp to provide quarters for approximately 30,000 officers and enlisted men, the camp was enlarged in the early spring of 1942 when what was originally known as "West Claiborne Annex," was constructed and made a portion of the main camp. During 1942 tents were replaced by "hutments." These structures are of two sizes, those for enlisted personnel housing 15 men, while smaller ones accommodate two officers. Since the occupancy of the camp much has been accomplished in the manner of drainage, landscaping and paving of streets. This has much enhanced the beauty-as well as the comfort of Claiborne. Camp Claiborne has its own post office, bank, numerous post exchanges, a chapel for practically every unit the size of a regiment, six well equipped theatres, three guest houses, five service clubs, a large sports arena and commodious bus station, while each company has its own day room. The facilities comprise water works, natural gas, electricity and sewerage. The climate is admirably suited for year-around training as winters are mild and summers not excessively hot. Located near the historic Evangeline country, it is visited by many tourists throughout the year. The first camp commander was Major General Ellard A. Walsh (who also commanded the 34th infantry division), followed by Lieutenant Colonel R. E. Craig, Lieutenant Colonel A. V. Ednie, Colonel H. McE. Pendleton and Colonel London J. Lockett, who is the present commander.

Camp Cooke - A Camera Trip Through Camp Cooke
Camp Cooke - A Camera Trip Through Camp Cooke
History of Camp Cooke ....... Centrally located in the midst of Southern California's rolling hills, Camp Cooke is situated in the center of a 42,000 acre grant, famous since the days of the Dons. Three great ranches, granted by the King of Spain 150 years ago, are incorporated in the area. The beautiful terrain offers unusually fine training grounds for the production of tough, rugged soldiers and prepares them to meet any foe on the face of the earth. The Pacific Coast from Lompoc on the south to Guadalupe on the north, from inland Casmalia to the turbulent waters, the broad plains, lupin and sage covered mesas, tremble to the tread and sound of the nation's youth training for War. Named in memory of one of the outstanding leaders and military pioneers of California, General Philip St. George Cooke, Camp Cooke is steeped in Army tradition. It is the policy of the War Department to name new Army camps in recognition of military personnel who have contributed to the ideals and traditions of the army. To immortalize the name of the dashing cavalry officer, explorer, and historian, the reservation site was selected to bear his name. When war broke out between the states in 1861, many officers who had graduated from the United States Military Academy and served as officers in the United States Army, cast their lot with the Southern cause due to the fact that they had been born in the South and that their sympathies were with the South. There were exceptions however, and among them was Major General Philip St. George Cooke, a native of Virginia. Cooke stayed with the Northern States and the Stars and Stripes. His loyalty was never questioned and he was given a most important assignment in Washington. It was a hard decision to make, as Cooke's son and son-in-law both were officers in the Confederate Army. Cooke had already been to California as leader of a battalion of Missourians who were Mormons. Of his Mormon battalion, Cooke wrote home that the column was handicapped in their march westward due to the fact that the Mormons were accompanied by their families and that the size of the families multiplied frequently while en route to California. On his arrival in San Diego in January, 1847, General Cooke served prominently in breaking a deadlock between military and naval officers respecting control of the new territory. His military record reveals that he played a most important part in settling the West over a period of some fifteen years. His march at the head of the Mormon Battalion brought him recognition as a builder of a practical wagon road that others were to use in later years. Military history records him as an officer who was loyal to the United States when duty called. This book pictures Camp Cooke in an era of life and use and portrays a number of the activities of the life of a soldier in training. A schedule of hard work develops physical and mental preparedness. Steel muscles, iron nerves and the determination to win are the keynotes of the program. Evenings of play and relaxation round out every-day life. All phases of normal human interests are developed at Camp Cooke. Chapels are accessible to all military personnel bringing surcease to the devout of all religious denominations. Fine libraries provide ample reading matter. Motion picture theatres feature the finest films produced. Two Guest Houses are available to visitors. Two splendid Service Clubs incorporate every possible facility for the amusement and pleasure of servicemen. Every encouragement is offered to develop the physical and spiritual welfare of the soldiers. All in all, Camp Cooke constitutes a monument to the foresight, perseverance and intelligence of the pioneer military personnel who planned and constructed the great training center.

Camp Croft - A Camera Trip Through Camp Croft Spartanburg, SC
Camp Croft - A Camera Trip Through Camp Croft Spartanburg, SC
History of Camp Croft ....... Two years after treachery struck the blow at Pearl Harbor that plunged the United States into a bloody war, Camp Croft is well into its third year. Under the able leadership of Maj. Gen. Durward S. Wilson, commander of the infantry replacement training center, and Col. Wilbur J. Fox, post commander, Camp Croft has played an important part in the events which are graven across the pages of history in smoke and flame. From December, 1940, when the first spadeful of earth was turned up on the site that was later to become one of the finest training camps in the country, the cantonment forged ahead weathering many storms during its period of construction. Then, March 27, 1941, the first group of recruits began to trickle in with Brig. Gen. Louis A. Kunzig in command of the post and entrusted with the task of turning civilians into soldiers steeled to the rigors of modern warfare. Many changes in the command of the post took place in the ensuing months with Maj. Gen. Oscar W. Griswold, Maj. Gen. Alexander M. Patch, Brig. Gen. Clarence R. Hueber, and Maj. Gen. P. L. Ransom taking the reins in rapid succession. For a year Camp Croft was a beehive of activity, turning out fighting men for America's armed forces, and then, on April 6, 1942, the citizens of Spartanburg were given the chance to see the results obtained when 1,000 Croft soldiers participated in an army day parade through Spartanburg's main street. April also saw the activation of the first negro regiment at Croft under Col. John D. Newton. Expansion was still the order of the day when Croft added 1,349 acres of land the following month to take care of the rapidly growing population of South Carolina's "newest city." In June a new unit was added to the cantonment with the formal opening of the Induction station near the station hospital. The first big change in Camp Croft's headquarters set-up since the activation of the camp in September when the infantry replacement training center and the Fourth Service Command units were split into two distinct departments, with Maj. Gen. Charles F. Thompson named as commandant of the infantry replacement training center, and Col. Griffith designated as post commander. This month also saw Brig. Gen. Reginald W. Buzzell installed as assistant to General Thompson. General Thompson, however, held command of the infantry replacement training center for only two months before Maj. Gen. Durward S. Wilson took active command on Nov. 10, 1942. On April 18, 1943 Brig. Gen. Francis V. Logan had been named assistant commander of the infantry replacement training center, replacing General Buzzell. Colonel Griffith retired from active duty in the army on Sept. 30, 1943, with Colonel Fox taking command. Colonel Fox had been identified with the post several years before when he did a tour of duty as the camp special service officer. Camp Croft bears the name of the late Maj. Gen. Edward Croft, once chief of infantry, who was born and reared in nearby Greenville, S. C. The suggestion of the Croft name came from General Kunzig, first commander of the post, and currently post commander of Camp Blanding, Fla. Camp Croft carries on with every man resolved that the dawn of victory shall dispel the darkening shadows of aggression on the not too distant horizons.

Camp Croft - Camp Croft, South Carolina
Camp Croft - Camp Croft, South Carolina
Camp Croft, one of the Nation's leading Infantry Replacement Centers, is named in Honor of the late Major General Edward Croft ... is situated five miles southeast of Spartanburg, S. C., on state highway No. 9 ... Occupies 18,000 acres and is still growing ..... Has 674 buildings with more under construction ... Has a total compliment of 18,000 men and accommodates 16 battalions ... Doctors, lawyers, truck drivers, artists ... men from all walks of life ... approximately 65,000 will pass through camp annually and become buddies for the thirteen-week training period.

Camp Crowder
Camp Crowder
From the four corners of the nation, America's finest manhood flows into Camp Crowder, Missouri, the home of the Central Signal Corps Training Center, the largest Signal Corps training center in the entire world. The camp, located on the edge of the picturesque Ozark mountain region, is named for General Enoch Herbert Crowder, a native Missourian, who authored the Selective Service Act of the first World War and who, as Provost Marshal General, was responsible for its successful administration. At this training center the soldiers receive complete and comprehensive courses in all phases of communications work, learning how to "Get the Message Through" under every possible condition which might arise in today's all-out global warfare. Here they are taught to operate and maintain those communication mediums, telephone, radio, telegraph and their related fields, that knit our far-flung armies into one coordinated unit. Ground was broken at Camp Crowder on August 30, 1941, on what was then rolling farm land, dotted with small orchards, corn fields and modest farm homes. The first troops moved in December 2, just five days before Pearl Harbor. With the declaration of war, the camp's construction program was put into high speed and the serious business of training soldiers in even greater numbers got immediately under way. Today, the post encompasses nearly 50,000 acres and is a city of thousands of buildings. Every possible Signal Corps training facility is at hand, and virtually every convenience is available in camp for the men during their spare-time hours. These include numerous post-exchanges which purvey hundreds of personal articles soldiers may need or desire; three Service Clubs, where entertainment is provided every evening; three Guest Houses, which are operated as hotels for soldiers' guests; five theaters, presenting first-run movies every evening; many chapels, where every soldier may worship according to his own faith; a huge fieldhouse, with facilities for every type of indoor athletics; scores of recreation halls and dayrooms; a modern hospital; post office; radio broadcasting studio, from which soldier-talent shows are aired daily; bakery; laundry. A camp newspaper, "The Camp Crowder Message," is published weekly. Regular bus service around camp and to surrounding communities is available, as well as train service directly from camp. Camp Crowder is situated five miles south of Neosho, a thriving community with a pre-war population of 5,000. Larger communities, Joplin, 40,000 population, and Carthage, 12,000, lie some 20 miles farther and may be reached by hourly bus service. The region around Camp Crowder is one famed for its folk-lore and its recreational facilities.

Camp Crowder II
Camp Crowder II
Located in the heart of the picturesque Ozark Mountain region, Camp Crowder is the home of the Army Service Forces Training Center, largest signal corps training center in the world. The post was named for General Enoch Herbert Crowder. native Missourian, who attained fame as the author of the Selective Act of the first World War and who, as Provost Marshal General, was responsible for its successful administration. He served as Judge Advocate General, and was for a time professor of military tactics at the University of Missouri. General Crowder predicted, on the day of the first World War Armistice: "We have stopped too soon ... we should never have stopped until we were in Berlin. It will not be 25 years until we will have to do this all over again." He was honored as a distinguished soldier, lawyer, statesman, diplomat and administrator and is well described by the simple words on his tombstone in Arlington Cemetery: "A military man who understood the spirit of a free people." Ground was broken at Camp Crowder August 30, 1941, on what was then rolling farm land, dotted with small orchards, cornfields and modest farm homes. The first troops moved in December 2, just five days before the attack on Pearl Harbor. With the declaration of war, work on the project was speeded and the serious business of training troops in ever greater numbers got immediately under way. Nearest town to Camp Crowder is Neosho, Newton County seat, six miles north of the post, with a prewar population of about 5,000. Larger towns of Carthage (population approximately 10,000) and Joplin (population about 40,000), lie some twenty miles further north, and may be reached by bus service.

Camp Davis - Introducing Camp Davis
Camp Davis - Introducing Camp Davis
Davis is one of the great training centers of World War II. It is also One of the first war camps built. Intended as an antiaircraft training center, the first troops arrived in April, 1941, less than five months after construction commenced, and eight months before Pearl Harbor. Since then Camp Davis has become the focal point of all Army activities on the 320 mile Carolina coastline, training and serving all types of arms and services that compose a modern army. Seeking isolation from interference to insure uninterrupted training, the camp proper is located in the great Holly Shelter pocosin whose massive silence is now broken by the din of ack-ack, while the shores near Sears Landing echo the cannonade of larger calibers. Nor is this the first time that the noise of war has broken the peace of these lowlands, still haunted by the memories of Indians and pirates, slavers and Spanish marauders, Regulators and Taxmasters, Green and Cornwallis, and climaxed by the greatest naval bombardment in the world's history at Fort Fisher. Now a new chapter is written here, as men bivouac on these same trails to prepare for global service. Camp Davis has touched the lives of many thousands in this war. This booklet is intended for them as a reminder of things accomplished and an inspiration to share with pride this great war center built by men now speeding the day of Victory on the world's battle fronts.

Camp Elliott Pocket Guide to TADCEN
Camp Elliott Pocket Guide to TADCEN
The U. S. Naval Training and Distribution Center ( TADCEN for short ) at Camp Elliott is the Grand Central Station of the 11th Naval District. The end of the war against Japan has not resulted in any noticeable change in our pace. If anything, the station is busier now than before. TADCEN is an important stopover for nearly every officer and man who comes aboard. For the man fresh from training and headed for duty overseas it is his last contact with the USA for awhile. For the man returning from duty afloat or ashore overseas TADCEN is the first port Stateside and these days for most men it is the place where discharge moves into the realm of reality. Whether you are here for a few hours, a few days, a few weeks, a few months or a few years, we want you to know the station, its functions, its recreation facilities and liberty opportunities. To answer all your questions without you' having to ask them, this booklet was prepared.

Camp Gordon and Augusta, Georgia
Camp Gordon and Augusta, Georgia
A 28 page picture book of Camp Gordon and the nearby city of Augusta, Georgia. Format 9" x 12"

Camp Gordon, Georgia
Camp Gordon, Georgia
Reville! ....... Camp Gordon, Georgia, located some 14 miles from the hospitable city of Augusta, Georgia, is a streamlined, motorized Triangular Division Camp, utilizing the Rectangular Block Pian which provides complete centralized control of the units, and so designed that it can be expanded 35 per cent without increasing utility facilities. It embraces 63,000 acres, has an elevation of 475 feet. The Camp is named after Lieutenant General John B. Gordon of the Confederate Army. First actual construction work started August 11, 1941. Dedication on October 18, 1941, featured as principal speaker the present Lieutenant General Brehon D. Somervell, now Commander of the Services of Supply, Army of the United States. The first troops arrived December 15, 1941. Complete with all the latest types of firing ranges and training courses, Camp Gordon has 820,000 square yards of paved motor parks, and a 125-acre parade ground one and one-quarter miles long and a quarter mile wide. It has its own bakery, laundry, Service Club, Post Exchanges - and is the only camp in the country with its own golf driving range and putting green for enlisted men.

Camp Haan and Camp Irwin
Camp Haan and Camp Irwin
Extensive, ever-growing Camp Haan, in Riverside County, California, some sixty-five miles from Los Angeles, has become the largest anti-aircraft artillery training center in the nation and the growth has taken place in little more than a year. It was early in 1942 - shortly after Pearl Harbor, when Haan was activated into an anti-aircraft artillery training center. Today, it can claim first place in size of all similar camps in the United States. Here soldiers are born. In an amazingly short time, officers mold civilians into hard-fighting and accurate-firing anti-aircraft gunners. In a few weeks men who were office workers, students, cigar store clerks, aircraft workers, elevator boys, movie actors, and followers of a hundred other occupations and professions are trained to shoot and bayonet and march, and become ready to serve alongside all branches of the service in any part of the world. As the new soldier assimilates the fundamentals of movement, of firing, of living in the field, of camouflaging, of becoming a fighting unit, he is hardened physically as well. But there is more to training than just work. Soldiers play, too. Many of the pictures in this booklet will show soldiers as they relax and enjoy shows and motion pictures; as they skate, swim, dance, sing and play ball; as they attend church, as they lounge in their day room and their service clubs and entertain Sunday visitors. For the Army has great faith in the adage which says that all work and no play makes Jack a dull soldier. This huge California camp was named after Genera! William George Haan, commander of one of the most famous divisions of the last war - the 32nd. General Haan commanded the 32nd from its forma tion at Waco, Texas in September, 1917, and directed its activities when it sailed to France and saw action in four fronts: At Alsace; on the Aisne-Marne front; during Germany's big push; at Chateau-Thierry, and in the Argonne. Today, in 1943, the spirit of General Haan is carried on in the person of Major General Homer R. Oldfield, who is commanding officer of the Anti-aircraft Artillery Training Center at Haan. General Oldfield spent three years in charge of antiaircraft defenses of the vital Panama Canal Zone before being assigned to the Southern California camp, forwhich he was recently awarded the Legion of Merit. He and his capable staff are turning out first rate fighting men who will play a decisive role in winning this greatest of wars. Colonel Charles H. Mason, who has seen battle action in four theaters of war and has carried out many a military diplomatic mission during his more than forty years in the Service, has been commanding officer of Camp Haan since early in 1942. When the final battle of this War of Survival is fought and won for the United Nations, a significant part will have been played by thousands of men who first received their training in warfare at Camp Haan, Riverside County, California.

Camp Hood - Texas
Camp Hood - Texas
Camp Hood, one of the largest and newest military establishments in the United Stateswas activated on September 18, 1942, as the Tank Destroyer Center. More recently it has become a training center for other branches of the service as well. Here now are the Infantry Replacement Training Center, Tank Destroyer Center, Tank Destroyer Replacement Training Center, Tank Destroyer School, Tank Destroyer Board, Field Artillery troops of the Fourth Army, and units of the Army Service Forces such as Ordnance, Signal Corps, Engineers, Quartermaster, Chemical Warfare, Medical Corps, Transportation and the Women's Army Corps. Named for General John B. Hood, the "Fighting General of the South" in the War between the States, Camp Hood covers 160,000 acres-of rolling hills and verdant valleys in the heart of Central Texas. This Texas soil once echoed to the pounding of horses' hoofs as Comanche and Kiowa Indians hit the warpath against early settlers. Old Fort Gates, built in 1849 to protect pioneers from the Indians, was on the site of what is now North Camp Hood. At Camp Hood, the Infantry Replacement Training Center was activated on March 10, 1944. The IRTC is billeted from 31st Street on the East to 72nd Street on the West and between Central Avenue on the North and Headquarters Avenue on the South. The IRTC provides basic military training for new men, gives them the background for service in the infantry. The basic training program covers many important subjects and qualifies men for assignment to an activated unit where they receive advanced training. Each man now starting his training should apply himself unstintingly to the lessons taught in basic training, purpose of which is to harden him physically that he may withstand the rigors of war, to teach him to use his weapons effectively that the enemy may feel the effects of his superiority, and to teach the principles of military discipline and courtesy. All of these factors are essential to success in modern warfare. Your officers and non-commissioned officers are highly qualified, having been especially selected because of long experience and proved capability as instructors. A great majority of them were once "basics" themselves, and they have a keen understanding of your problems and are ready to help you with your difficulties. Give them the fullest attention and cooperation during all phases of your training. Study your Soldier's Handbook diligently. It will be of great value to you in every phase of your training. Your basic training necessarily will be rigorous, and at times some of the routine may seem unimportant to you. But remember that everything you do at Camp Hood has an important meaning. All the knowledge disseminated to you has been sifted from actual battle experience and presented to you so you will have the knowledge, confidence, and endurance to succeed against the enemy.

Camp Hood - This is Camp Hood
Camp Hood - This is Camp Hood
The Story of Camp Hood ....... Here the spirit of the black panther is instilled into tough combat teams to break the chains barbarians would put on free men. Here his cunning and stealth - his knack of killing from ambush, is combined with all the modern technique of war. Here the newest mechanized equipment and men toughened by intensive training are brought together- the primitive blends with the modern way of war, the human factor with the armored, quick-hitting war machines, to the end that enemy tanks shall be smashed into scrap. No matter where we may go to finish our part of the job, we'll remember the constant drive of activity at Camp Hood, the Tank Destroyer Center; along the avenues and streets, across the fields to the bivouac areas, every energy aimed at our primary job, the destruction of hostile tanks by superior marksmanship. Little more than a year ago Camp Hood was a rolling plain in Central Texas that stretched to the horizon, a vista scarcely broken by any human touch. And then, overnight it seemed, buildings arose as if by magic; roads and courses took shape, and the men of the Tank Destroyers moved in. By May, 1943, Camp Hood had become one of the largest military installations in the country, with a reservation of 160,000 acres designed to provide the special training which has made the Tank Destroyers one of the most feared Arms of Service today. North Camp Hood had been set up, providing a second cantonment on one of the finest natural sites for Army training in the country ... a training ground unmatched for its variety of terrain and climatic conditions to fit the men for battle anywhere in the world. Like a modern factory, the Tank Destroyer Center uses a multiple assembly line method in training. On one line we may be trained as individual replacements; another line turns out units fully trained as such, and the final assembly line sends these combat teams out to the battlefronts as a cohesive, striking force. It is an elastic system, one which can turn out battalions, groups, regiments or brigades, shaping its product to the current needs of the combat theaters. We may enter this assembly line as raw material from the induction centers, to be trained as individuals with the replacement training center, at North Camp Hood, or we may be assigned to other groups to join our fellow soldiers in combat teams, later to be sent to the Unit Training Center at Camp Hood; we may join the Training Brigade to act as part of the demonstration platoon, or we might become specialists in the Tank Destroyer School. We will come to appreciate the careful planning which has gone into the making of this Center as we learn to drive, to maneuver the tank destroyers over difficult terrain, to handle the basic weapons of the TDs. From the first battle-conditioning and infiltration courses in the Army we learn combat discipline, self-preservation, offensive measures; to conquer fear and to have confidence in the techniques we have learned on Hood's far-flung acres. When the time comes for us to face the enemy our utilization of this knowledge and training will be invaluably effective. Constantly improvements are being made in instruction methods as reports come in from all over the world of the achievements of Tank Destroyer battalions, "the first to march into Bizerte." That is what we are trained for here, to meet the enemy wherever we can surprise and waylay him, to match him or better him, weapon for weapon, man to man, hand to hand and to emerge the victor! That is the Tank Destroying Panther's job to "Seek, Strike, Destroy!" Many of these pictured scenes we'll soon know from experience, they'll be treasured later when we return home, after we have utilized the benefits of our Camp Hood training to help destroy, forever, the Evil Forces of Germany and Japan that made it imperative for America and our Allies, in the interests of honor and self preservation, to depart from our normal ways of peace.

Camp Howze - A Camera Trip Through Camp Howze
Camp Howze - A Camera Trip Through Camp Howze
History of Camp Howze ....... Activated August 17, 1942, by the first official order of Col. John P. Wheeler, camp commander, Camp Howze typifies the spirit of America in this war. This huge new infantry division training camp is the result of America's determination to win the war in the quickest possible manner. Its fighting units have been trained to enter battle with the same "hurry up" attitude. From the start they have known their objective and how they will attack. Camp Howze is a temporary cantonment, designed for immediate utility, and built in a hurry. Buildings are drab, much of the area is bare and treeless, but the natural desire of men to have pleasant surroundings has won out. Throughout the entire camp, soldiers have laid gravel sidewalks and "policed up" company areas adding meticulous neatness to the serviceability of the installation. Amazingly enough, most of Camp Howze was ready for use about five months after the first workmen arrived. Army officers first inspected the campsite in the middle of 1940. On January 31, 1940, the City of Gainesville received a questionnaire from the War Department asking if the city wished to have an Army camp nearby. The issue was finally settled when the War Department announced on December 18, 1941, that the Camp Howze area had been selected for a military reservation. On that same day, government land agents arrived and moved to acquire the land for the government. Actual construction began in April on the railroad siding, wells, and roads. By September, barely more than five months later, the first soldiers had moved in to begin their duties while carpenters and electricians continued to work round the clock completing barracks and other buildings. Much of the colorful history of the West grew up on ground now covered by barracks or used for artillery ranges. Where Jeeps, half tracks, and scout cars roll through Black Hollow in the range area, desperadoes once ambushed stage coaches and robbed the passengers. The north reservation section along the Red River a year ago was still the country of the Western novels. Now some of that cattle country serves as an artillery shell impact area. Other land gives infantry soldiers excellent maneuver area. The country is a great deal like that in which Maj. Gen. Robert Lee Howze first saw service. General Howze, for whom the camp is named, was a veteran of two major wars, an Indian campaign, and the Philippine Insurrection. He was twice cited for the Congressional Medal of Honor. Born at Overton, Texas, August 22, 1864, General Howze died at Columbus, Ohio, September 19, 1926. The General was appointed to West Point in 1883, and first saw action in South Dakota when the Sioux tribes caused a disturbance and his cavalry regiment was sent to quell the trouble. By 1918, General Howze had become a temporary Major General, commanding the 38th Division in France. Later, he commanded the 3rd Division and remained with the Army of Occupation until 1 919. He became a permanent Major General in 1922. The same type of rolling plains which gave General Howze his first taste of action are today giving soldiers of 1943 the basic training they will need to defeat their enemies. Over the thousands of acres of Camp Howze, hundreds of men are training, learning the rugged profession of the modern soldier. Two divisions which served the country in World War I have already made use of the excellent training terrain here in North Texas. This immense Army Ground Forces training area is directed by the Eighth Service Command with headquarters in Dallas, commanded by Maj. Gen. Richard Donovan. The 1885th Service Unit operates the camp's headquarters, supply, service, and police sections. First soldiers arrived here in August of 1942 to form the nucleus of the station complement quartermaster detachment. It wasn't long before GI's rolled in by the thousands. The 84th Infantry Division was activated September 15, with hundreds of civilian spectators braving mud and rain to attend the ceremony, only to find that the weather had forced the program indoors. The 84th, which had its beginning at Camp Zachary Taylor, Kentucky, back in 1917, received its old colors "for trie-duration" of this war from the school children of Kentucky, who had bought the flag in the last war and kept it in trust since the division's return from France. Proudly flaunted was the division's Railsplitter insignia, symbol of the 84th's pioneer spirit. First commander of the 84th was Maj. Gen. John H. Hilldring, who later left to take up another post in Washington. He was succeeded by Maj. Gen. Stonewall Jackson. With the training of the 84th Division under way, attention went to the 86th Infantry Division, with its Blackhawk insignia becoming a familiar sight as men continued to arrive. Cadre and officers complete, the 86th was activated December 15 under the command of Maj. Gen. Alexander E. Anderson. General Anderson was stricken with a heart attack and died early in the morning of December 24, 1942. His command was assumed by Maj. Gen. Harris M. Melasky.

Camp Howze - Texas
Camp Howze - Texas
Development of Camp Howze - in all phases of work and training carried on here since activation day, August 17, 1942, Camp Howze has typified the spirit of America in this war. This huge new infantry division training camp is the result of America's determination to win in the quickest possible manner. Its fighting units have been trained to enter battle with the same "hurry up" attitude. Camp Howze is a temporary cantonment, designed for immediate utility and built in a hurry. But the natural desire of men to have pleasant surroundings is apparent. Everywhere, units have laid neat sidewalks of gravel, and well-tended plots of grass surround orderly rooms and mess halls. Actual construction of the railroad siding, wells, and roads for Camp Howze began in April, 1942. By September, barely more than five months later, the first soldiers moved in to begin their duties while carpenters and electricians continued to work around the clock completing barracks and other buildings. Much of the colorful history of the West was made on ground now covered by barracks or used for artillery ranges here. Where jeeps, half-tracks, and scout cars roll through Black Hollow in the range area, desperadoes once ambushed stage coaches and robbed the passengers. The north reservation along the Red River a year ago was still the country of the Western novels. Now some of that cattle country serves as an artillery shell impact area. Other land gives infantry soldiers excellent maneuver area. The country is a great deal like that in which Major Gen. Robert Lee Howze first saw service. General Howze, for whom the camp is named, was a veteran of two major wars, an Indian campaign, and the Philippine Insurrection. He was twice cited for the Congressional Medal of Honor. Born at Overton, Texas, on August 22, 1864, General Howze died at Columbus, Ohio, September 19, 1926. The same type of rolling plains which gave General Howze his first taste of action now are giving soldiers the basic training they need to defeat their enemies. Over the thousands of acres of Camp Howze, hundreds of men are learning the rugged profession of the modern soldier. Two divisions which served the country in World War I have already made use of the excellent training terrain here. This immense Army Ground Forces training area is directed by the Eighth Service Command with headquarters in Dallas. The Camp Commander is Col. John P. Wheeler. The 1885th Service Unit operates the camp's headquarters, supply, service, and police sections.

Camp Kilmer
Camp Kilmer
Welcome home and welcome to Camp Kilmer! The Post Commander and his staff assure you that everything will be done for your comfort and pleasure during your short stay here. For your information Camp Kilmer was activated in June 1942, the first staging area to be built solely for that purpose in the United States. It is also the largest staging area in the United States and has handled more than two and a half million troops. Named for Joyce Kilmer, the soldier-poet of World War I whose home was in nearby New Brunswick, Camp Kilmer is an installation of the New York Port of Embarkation, part of the Army Service Forces' gigantic Transportation Corps. This booklet contains the answers to most of the questions you will have while here. Keep it in your possession, it will be of great assistance to you now and an interesting souvenir when you get home.

Camp Kohler - A Camera Trip Through Camp Kohler
Camp Kohler - A Camera Trip Through Camp Kohler
History of Camp Kohler ....... Camp Kohler was established in September 1942 as the third Signal Corps Replacement Training Center to help meet the ever-increasing need for trained specialists to operate and maintain the Army's vast communications system in a war which already had become global in its proportions. Located twelve miles northeast of Sacramento at the site of the former Japanese collection center, Camp Kohler was named in honor of First Lieutenant Frederick L. Kohler, brilliant young Signal Corps officer from Oakland, Calif., who lost his life in March 1942 while serving with the Chinese military mission of Lieutenant General Joseph W. Stillwell. From a humble beginning, Camp Kohler grew rapidly into a modern military training center, transforming hundreds of newly-inducted men into competent soldiers, equipped mentally and physically to keep open the communications lines of America's and the United Nations' far-flung fighting forces. With the acquisition of the University of California Agriculture College campus at Davis, Calif., Camp Kohler became the headquarters for the Western Signal Corps Training Center, embracing both the Western Signal Corps Replacement Training Center at Camp Kohler and the Western Signal Corps School at Davis. In our struggle with the forces of evil, the fluidity and variety of battle-fronts and the world-encircling scope of the conflict place a greater emphasis on fighting the battle of communications than in any other war in history. Thousands of trained specialists - men who can function efficiently and speedily in the heat of combat - are a prerequisite of victory. To this end, Camp Kohler and the Signal Corps are dedicated.

Camp Lee - Quartermaster Replacement Center
Camp Lee - Quartermaster Replacement Center
On this land, hallowed by America's war for independence and by the battles of the War Between the States, and named in tribute to the South's great soldier, General Robert E. Lee, Camp Lee twice has risen to take its place in American military history. Site of training for World War I's famed 80th Division in 1917, the camp was torn down to become a State bird sanctuary two years later. With the emergency of 1940, as by magic, another Camp Lee sprang up, and early in 1941 undertook its mission, to produce American soldiers. Here is the Recruit Reception Center, where new men are received, classified, and assigned. Here is the Quartermaster School, training officers for their places of leadership. Here are medical units, service units, and the many other branches that go into the making of a modern Army. And here is the nation's largest Quartermaster Replacement Training Center . . .

Camp Lejeune
Camp Lejeune
From two hundred square of North Carolinian coastal wilderness, sand dunes, swamps, thin pines, tangled jungle growth, has emerged Camp Lejeune, greatest of Marine base training centers. On this site the reservation came into being through the sweat and toil of pre-Pearl Harbor Marines. Many of those fighting men are in the Pacific combat zone now. But thousands follow in their New River footsteps, sleep in their huts and tents, train in their combat schools. And more are coming! Here at New River is Fleet Marine Headquarters for the entire eastern seaboard. Here are the infantry, tanks, amphibious tractors, rifle ranges, heavy artillery, Paramarines, engineers, school battalion. Here operate those famous Higgins landing boats from which Marines tumble into the surf to establish beach heads. The New River area was chosen because of its natural advantages. Probably to a greater degree than any other eastern tract it spreads before training Marines the actual conditions they are later to encounter in combat. It readies Marines for amphibious as well as warfare. It is a stark reality. The reservation lies on both sides on New River. On the south side is the temporary "Tent Camp speeded to completion as part of the Marine Corps emergency expansion. Along the north banks of the stream are being constructed permanent brick accommodations for many thousands of Marines. Enlisted men receive their "boot" training at other bases, then come to New River for advanced instruction. They come as willing but unskilled recruits. They emerge as fighting, efficient units of combat teams. They're ready for battle and go to battle from Camp Lejeune.

Camp Livingston - A Camera Trip Through Camp Livingston
Camp Livingston - A Camera Trip Through Camp Livingston
History of Camp Livingston ....... Camp Livingston, one of the largest and most modern of southern Army posts, is located 15 miles northeast of Alexandria, Louisiana. It covers thousands of acres and has facilities for a tremendous number of men to train and live. Actual construction of Livingston was started in December, 1940, it was activated February 10, 1941 and completed March 31, 1941. Like a huge city if includes: large and thoroughly up-to-date hospital, incinerator, laundry, cold storage plant, motor repair shops, sewage disposal plant, utilities, water system, gas and electricity, four fire stations, paved roads, traffic lights and recreational facilities which cover practically every form of sports or relaxation. Thirteen chapels are nestled among the pines of every area. Enlisted men live in hutments, five men to the hut. These are of wood frame construction, affording maximum ventilation and heated by natural gas. Troops are quartered in an area approximately 1,350 acres with the balance reserved for training. In addition, Livingston men practice firing on newly acquired Breezy Hill, a 40,000 acre range several miles north of camp. The camp is situated in the Kisatchie National Forest and is considered an ideal year-round training post. For this reason the camp was constructed with an eye toward permanency. It was named for Robert Livingston, famous ambassador and jurist who was known as the father of the Louisiana purchase. He was sent to France and the court of Napoleon expressly for the purpose of stopping the transfer of the territory from its Spanish owners to the French. Unsuccessful, he did, however, gain the emperor's favor and arranged the sale of the tract to the United States. For the recreation of troops, Camp Livingston has much to offer. Two service clubs, white and colored, two libraries, four War Department theaters, a large all-purpose Sports Arena, which is perfect for roller skating, dancing, boxing, basketball courts and other team sports which keep the men of Livingston occupied in the brief periods of rest and relaxation during their rugged training schedule. And keeping the personnel informed on everything that goes on inside and outside the camp, is the Camp Livingston Communique, an eight-page newspaper. The "City of Livingston" is complete.

Camp Livingston Louisiana
Camp Livingston Louisiana
This is Camp Livingston. It's one of the best of the south's many training camps and named for Robert Livingston, famous jurist and ambassador and known as "the father of the Louisiana purchase." Situated in the midst of the Kisatchie National Forest, the camp comprises about 4,000 acres and boasts a 40,800-acre firing range at nearby Breezy Hill. First buildings sprang up here in the fall of 1940 and the camp was formally activated on Feb. 10, 1941. First division to undergo training was the crack 32nd, which has already won the commendation of General Douglas MacArthur. You'll find the climate is moderate and, although changeable, is ideal for year-round training. The main idea here, whether you're a rookie or a veteran, is to teach you to soldier. The new men will have basic training for several weeks, the oldsters will continue their training and begin to take on a lot of polish. But whether you're a rookie or a veteran you'll have to work hard. Your timing must be accurate. Your discipline must be perfect. Your unit and the other units it supports must click like a smooth working football team. This is war and a great deal is dependent upon how well you do your job.

Camp Maxey - A Camera Trip Through Camp Maxey
Camp Maxey - A Camera Trip Through Camp Maxey
History of Camp Maxey ....... Camp Maxey is located about eight miles north of Paris, Texas. It was activated July 15th, 1942 with Lieut. Col. C. H. Palmer as Camp Commander. The 102nd Infantry Division was the first division to be organized here and was activated on September 15th, 1942, with Gen. John B. Anderson as the Commander General. Col. Robert O. Annin became the second Camp Commander on March 25th, 1943. Since its activation, thousands of soldiers have been trained here for combat and other active duties overseas. Camp Maxey was named in honor of General Sam Bell Maxey who served the U. S. Army in a distinguished manner during the Civil War and later served as U. S. Senator for the State of Texas. He was a resident of Paris. Besides the division in training here, there are many non-divisional troops and soldiers of the Station Complement. During maneuvers, the Army Air Forces cooperates in the training program by providing fliers for training missions. Thus, the Army Ground Forces, Army Service Forces and Army Air Forces have had an integral part in the development of Camp Maxey activities. The great variety found in northern Texas terrain provides this Camp with ideal facilities for working out Infantry problems. The installations include many features of training for modern battle conditions. The Artillery has its own range along with those furnished for the smaller caliber guns. The obstacle course presents stiff problems while the infiltration course along with the "German Village" provide a reality to the problems which are outstanding in such maneuvers. It is fortunate that Camp Maxey is located so close to Paris, which is a beautiful city of 18,678 people. The Paris citizens have graciously offered many recreational activities and a spirit of helpfulness between the city and camp has developed through the desire of both soldier and citizen to speed the war effort as much as possible. The facilities on the Post for the soldier's comfort have been carefully considered. The picture story in this book tells of a soldier's life here at Camp Maxey: the comfortable living quarters; the soldierly routine; the recreational facilities; the opportunities for church going; the Post Exchange with itsmanyBranches;the good libraries for Enlisted Men and Officers and of course, the vital story of training to make the world's best Infantrymen.

Camp McCoy
Camp McCoy
Camp McCoy was named in honor of the late Major General Robert Bruce McCoy of the Wisconsin National Guard, who commanded the 128th Infantry of the 32nd Division in World War I. General McCoy was a resident of Sparta, Wisconsin. The Army points to Camp McCoy as the last word in training camps. Since its opening in August, 1942, Camp McCoy has gained fame as one of the outstanding combat training centers in the country. All the experience and practice the Army accumulated in building hundreds of training sites across the nation in the months before Pearl Harbor were combined and brought to full flower in the construction of Camp McCoy. The new camp (as differentiated from old Camp McCoy, now or prisoner of war camp) covers 61,000 acres of rugged terrain. Its facilities have been used to train infantry, artillery, engineer, ordnance, tank and tank destroyer, military police, anti-aircraft, and medical units. Two of the most famous units to train at McCoy were the 2nd and 76th Infantry divisions which gained glory in the battle against the Germans. Hundreds of barracks, 12 chapels, 6 theaters, 15 post exchanges, 13 recreation halls, 2 service clubs, 2 guest houses, dozens of office buildings and blocks of warehouses and shops make the camp one of the nation's largest.

Camp Phillips - A Camera Trip Through Camp Phillips
Camp Phillips - A Camera Trip Through Camp Phillips
In the geographical center of the United States, mid the rolling fields of Kansas wheat lies Camp Phillips, one of our nation's newest training centers. This huge garrison has, from the start, answered the nation's call for soldiers and has, through its splendid training facilities, equipped these soldiers with the ability to do their jobs well. That's Camp Phillips, a thriving military community, located on the same curving plains which, in years past, echoed to the beat of Indian ponies, the drums of the charging cavalry, and the ping of the musket as settlers brought down their buffalo. It's a country on whose honor roll are printed the names of the brave pioneers who forged their way westward and who fought to establish this land for their and their descendants' sake. William A. Phillips, a one-time newspaper correspondent, established the first townsite here, and during the civil war became a colonel of a regiment of Cherokee Indians. It is in his honor the camp is named. The criss-cross tracks of jeeps, half-tracks, heavy equipment and marching troops now churn the dust of the area which was once known as the northern end of the Chisholm Trail. Admittedly an ace among Army training camps, Camp Phillips does more than that towards the welfare of the troops stationed here. Her laundry and bakery compare favorably with those of large cities. Her warehouse area handles all supply problems with ease. The many chapels on the post serve many religions. The Army Exchanges handle huge volumes of soldier sales and the Recreation Halls and Service Clubs plus the theatres and U. S. O. features supply the soldiers' needs for recreational and entertainment facilities. Soldiers training here respect Camp Phillips for the education they are receiving, for the background they receive in making them members of the finest fighting unit in the world.

Camp Pickett - This is Camp Pickett
Camp Pickett - This is Camp Pickett
If, as we would like, all those who have a friendly interest in Camp Pickett were able to visit with us, this picture story of a soldier's city would have assumed a different emphasis. To record the spectacular instead of the ordinary, the rare instead of the commonplace, would have provided a more thrilling booklet; but it would not have faithfully portrayed what a visitor would likely see, nor the impression that will remain with the soldier long after he has forgotten the exceptional. Forty-six thousand acres in four Southside Virginia Counties, Lunenburg, Woffaway, Brunswick and Dinwiddie, were selected for the reservation which borders on the pleasant town of Blackstone. A phenomenon of military construction began early in January, 1942. Six months later, on July 3, 1942, thousands of soldiers had occupied its housing and training facilities, and took part in the camp's formal dedication. The camp derived its name that day from the distinguished Virginia soldier, Major General George Edward Pickett, who, at the same hour of the same day in 1863, launched his valiant charge at Gettysburg. Camp Pickett's primary purpose is to convert those who train here into the best instructed and best conditioned soldiers in the world. However, it has not been overlooked that but few of the trainees would normally have selected a military career. Therefore, for those hours which can be spared from training, every consideration has been given the soldier's religious, intellectual and recreational needs. Admittedly, an army camp is not home. But Camp Pickett is and will continue to be as agreeable a wartime abode as the emergency will permit. It this booklet conveys to you a knowledge of how and where your soldier trains, plays, eats and sleeps, and of the medical and dental care provided him; and if, for him, in the years to come, it stimulates other bivouacs in the realm of reminiscence, then the pages which follow will have truly earned the title: "This is Camp Pickett."

Camp Roberts - Souvenir of Camp Roberts, California
Camp Roberts - Souvenir of Camp Roberts, California
Camp Roberts, located on the Salinas River and Highway 101 approximately halfway between San Francisco and Los Angeles, is named after Corporal Harold W. Roberts, California born enlisted man who gave his life for a comrade in World War I. One of the largest Infantry and Artillery Replacement Training Centers in the world, Camp Roberts covers an area of 47,000 acres. More than 9,000 workmen spent 6,000,000 man hours building this huge camp. An ultra-modern hospital, with a capacity of approximately 1,300 beds, is maintained for the soldiers. Nine Chapels, in which services for each of the three great faiths are held, dot the camp. The American Red Cross, housed in its own building, has a large staff in attendance. The Soldier Bowl, a natural amphitheater large enough to hold the entire personnel of the camp, is an ideal setting for the many outdoor shows. On its stage, constructed after the California Mission style, world famous stars of stage, screen and radio have appeared. The Sports Arena is a huge gymnasium where soldiers may take any of various forms of exercise. It is the scene of theatricals and sports shows during the winter months. A Service Club is maintained for the exclusive use of the enlisted men and their guests. It contains a lounge, cafeteria and a well-stocked library. A Guest House, where relatives and guests of soldiers may secure emergency accommodations for not to exceed three days, is centrally located. Four theaters offer the latest in film entertainment. Three bowling alleys, each with eight alleys, are provided. Recreation halls are located in each of the battalion areas. Camp Exchanges, in each of the regimental areas, sell toilet articles, magazines, candy, writing materials, soft drinks, beer and other items. Tailor and barber shops are also located in each Camp Exchange. The Camp Roberts DISPATCH, written by soldiers, for soldiers, distributes more than 15,000 copies free of charge each week.

Camp Roberts - Souvenir of Camp Roberts, California II
Camp Roberts - Souvenir of Camp Roberts, California II
Detailed updates coming

Camp Roberts Trainer 1942
Camp Roberts Trainer 1942
Detailed updates coming

Camp Rucker - A Picture Parade of Camp Rucker Alabama
Camp Rucker - A Picture Parade of Camp Rucker Alabama
Camp Rucker, Alabama, of which Colonel Lloyd S. Spooner, Infantry, is the commanding officer, is built on a 65,000 acre reservation in the southeastern corner of the state. Its cantonment area, location of approximately 1,800 barracks, mess-halls, warehouses and other buildings, lies on a J-shaped ridge at the southernmost end of the reservation, between the towns of Enterprise and Ozark. The latter town provides the Camp's rail connection as well as a branch Post Office. Dothan, Alabama, the Camp's largest nearby civilian community, is 26 miles to the south, and Montgomery, the state capital, is a transportation terminal 100 miles to the north. The reservation, roughly rectangular in shape, includes streams, rolling country, open and wooded area. Sufficient in length to permit an Infantry division's Artillery training, its terrain is also well adapted to the training of troops of many other arms and services. A thousand acre lake provides an ideal location for land-and-water tactics. Since its activation on May 1, 1942, Camp Rucker has always been the home station of an Infantry division. In addition, it has been headquarters for numerous "group" commands including several of the Armored Force; a detachment of Second Army, and Medical Department organizations. The only basic training center for Army Nurses in the Fourth Service Command is located at Camp Rucker, largest and most varied military installation in the state. In appearance Camp Rucker differs from other cantonment camps of similar age thanks to a far-sighted program to prevent soil erosion, dust and sand storms, undertaken by its first commanding officer, Brig. Gen. F. W. Manley, USA, retired. During the Camp's first year, channeling conduits were placed at strategic points, thousands of acres of stripped ground were planted to Bermuda, St. Augustine and Zoysia grass, and more than 120,000 trees and shrubs were placed along roads and near important central buildings. The physical appearance of the Camp today belies its short existence. Recreation for the training soldier at Camp Rucker is afforded by four service clubs, three libraries, cafeterias and guest houses. There are six theaters, a central field house and scores of day rooms. Swimming facilities are maintained at Lake Tholocco during summer months. These are all Special Service activities, as is also the "Camp Rucker Reporter", a weekly newspaper. Catering to the tastes of its soldier population, Camp Rucker's Army Exchange Branch operates 19 PX's, including a bowling alley, barber shops, and, for Nurses, WACS and civilians, a beauty parlor. More than 25 chaplains care for the spiritual welfare of Camp Rucker's soldiers. Eleven architecturally-standardized Army chapels have been individually decorated with funds supplied by the Army Exchange. From Chapel No. 1, the Public Relations office in collaboration with the Camp Chaplain, offers three weekly music and religious service radio programs, heard over Dothan's Station WAGF. In addition, from its own building, the Public Relations office maintains a Saturday afternoon program, available for soldier talent, bands, glee clubs, individual musicians and entertainers. The personnel of the Station Complement, Army Service Forces, who administer these, as well as the many other facilities for the furtherance of training and the welfare of Camp Rucker's troops, are proud of their Camp. They feel it has an individual character, made of creative planning, work and happy circumstance. This pictorial record, both of the Camp and the training-in-warfare for which it exists, will serve, it is hoped, as a valued souvenir for the tens of thousands of men and women who during this war have made their military home at Camp Rucker.

Camp San Luis Obispo - A Picture Book of Camp San Luis Obispo California
Camp San Luis Obispo - A Picture Book of Camp San Luis Obispo California
Camp San Luis Obispo derives its name from the city of San Luis Obispo, five miles away, a community with a normal population of 9,000 which grew up gradually through the years around the Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa, founded in 1772 by Father Junipero Serra. The camp nestles in Chorro Valley at the foot of the Santa Lucia mountains of the Coast Range, midway between Los Angeles and San Francisco, and a short march from the Pacific Ocean at Morro Bay. The region, with its thriving beef cattle, dairy, and other agricultural pursuits, is rich in scenic beauty and the historic influences of Spain and Old Mexico. Three flags have flown here, those of Spain, Mexico and the Republic of California, before the Stars and Stripes of the United States of America were unfurled over the presidios along the California coast. The camp site was formerly Camp Merriam, summer training ground of the California National Guard, marked by a cluster of administration buildings. Construction of the present federal establishment, at a cost of more than $17,000,000, was commenced in the fall of 1940 and completed in the early summer of 1941. The camp was first a city of pyramidal tents among miles of roads and streets, parade grounds, ranges and basic utility installations, but in 1942 the tent frames were converted to wooden hutments. The hutments, each of which accommodates a maximum of six men, are small cabins with windows and gabled roofs, and are heated with oil-burning stoves. Infantry divisions and other units have received training here, and tens of thousands of men have gone from Camp San Luis Obispo to various theaters of combat throughout the world. The picture story in this book is necessarily limited to fragments of camp life and activities, because of restrictions for the security of military information. It is attempted, however, to tell part of the story of each man's activities here, and to give an insight into the camp routine and recreation enjoyed as the soldier prepares for combat.

Camp Shelby - Mississippi
Camp Shelby - Mississippi
Soon after the 38th Division arrived at Camp Shelby in World War I, the camp was swept by a cyclone, so the 38th became the "Cyclone Division" with its "CY" insignia. Camp Shelby maintained a high health record during the war and won commendation for discipline and efficiency. With the close of the conflict the camp was dismantled and the site acquired by Mississippi for use as a summer camp for its National Guard. With mobilization for World War II Camp Shelby was leased by the War Department and work on the camp started September 1940. A month later the 37th Division of Ohio arrived to occupy temporary quarters. The 38th Division followed. By 1941 the tent city was transformed into the modern hutment type. Approximately 360,000 acres were acquired and maneuver rights obtained on an additional 400,000 acres. The original cost of the camp was in excess of $20,000,000 and at one time 17,000 workmen were employed in its construction. The camp is Mississippi's second largest city. It has 15 deep artesian wells with a daily capacity of 10,000,000 gallons. It is equipped with two sewage disposal plants and a 60-mile sewerage system. More than 100 miles of hard-surfaced highways and 105 miles of connecting roads traverse the area. Facilities at Camp Shelby are ample for the soldier's health, training and comfort. The camp is equipped with one of the largest hospitals within the Fourth Service Command. It operates six service clubs, eight moving picture theatres, bowling alleys, more than 60 Post Exchange stores, maintenance and repair shops and refrigeration plants. Through its Induction Station Mississippians are processed into the service. The first post commander of the present camp was Lt. Colonel John N. Robinson, who was promoted full colonel and transferred to command a regiment. He was followed by Colonel Eley P. Denson, now brigadier-general, who was succeeded by Colonel G. M. Halloran, December, 1941, now in command. Colonel Halloran was promoted to brigadier general October, 1 942. Colonel Loren R. Brooks has been post executive officer under all three. Camp Shelby is under the Fourth Service Command. Under General Halloran Camp Shelby functions as an outstanding mobilization-type camp. Men in training apply their talents in a practical and comprehensive program that includes soldiering, landscaping, drainage, conservation and recreation. Engineering units are constructing a dam, lake and much-needed recreational park. Among the thousands who have trained at Camp Shelby are Japanese-American soldiers and colored troops. "Alumni" from the camp are engaged on practically every far-flung battlefront. Insignia on the front cover and the opposite page indicate the units that have trained at Shelby. Serving two World Wars, Camp Shelby has earned a fighting tradition and its men an enviable reputation for discipline and efficiency. Camp Shelbians are of the stuff that fired the spirit of Isaac Shelby, their immortal namesake.

Camp Sibert - This is Camp Sibert Alabama
Camp Sibert - This is Camp Sibert Alabama
Were it possible for all those who have a friendly interest in the Chemical Warfare Service to have seen Camp Sibert, this picture story would have been developed more elaborately. However, by recording the ordinary everyday activities of those in whom you are interested, instead of the spectacular, we believe you will have an exact picture of the camp as an unannounced visitor would see it. These "Scenes of Sibert" are the treasured memories which thousands of Chemical Warfare Service soldiers will take back to thousands of American cities and towns and villages. Camp Sibert is situated on a plateau-like clearing at the southern terminus of the historical Lookout Mountain chain. It was named in honor of Major General William L. Sibert, native of Gadsden, Alabama, veteran of two major wars, engineer on the Panama Canal construction and First Chief of the Chemical Warfare Service during World War I. Camp Sibert's primary purpose is to develop those who train here into the best instructed and conditioned combat technicians in the world. Nor do we overlook the fact that most of our men have taken up arms as a necessity and not a career. Therefore during those hours which can be spared from training, every consideration has been given to his religious, intellectual and recreational needs. Camp Sibert may not be home, but on the whole, we, the wearers of the "Crossed Retorts," are an integral part of the happiest, healthiest, best fed and clothed Army in the world. As part of that Army we likewise have one objective, complete victory over the Axis military machine. If this booklet conveys you to a better knowledge of how and where your soldier trains and eats and sleeps, the medical and dental care accorded him, and if, after VICTORY has been won, it will serve to recall in the remoteness of reminiscent years the friendships he made here, then the scenes through which you are about to pass will have deserved the title, "This is Camp Sibert."

Camp Springs Army Air Base - Washington, D.C.
Camp Springs Army Air Base - Washington, D.C.
Located about 10 miles southeast of the nation's Capitol, Camp Springs Field is the home of the 122nd AAF Base Unit ( CCTS-F ) and the 161st AAF Base Unit ( FC ). The Base is unique in that it is dispersed as one would find such a field in a theater of operations. Its 4,400 acres are set in a forest of scrawny pine and oak which nearly obscures many of its facilities. Colonel William L. Boyd is Commanding Officer. A veteran pilot who was at Hickam Field, T.H., when the Japs attacked Pearl Harbor, Colonel Boyd was awarded the Purple Heart and cited for outstanding leadership and courage in the action that followed. Camp Springs Field was established in November of 1942 as a base of the First Air Force. On 15 December 1944, Headquarters of the Continental Air Forces was activated at Camp Springs Field, with Brigadier General Eugene H. Beebe in command.

Camp Stewart - A Camera Trip Through Camp Stewart
Camp Stewart - A Camera Trip Through Camp Stewart
History of Camp Stewart ....... Training anti-aircraft soldiers how to shoot down the enemy is the vital and grim business of the South's great Anti-aircraft Artillery Training Center at Camp Stewart. This military reservation in south coastal Georgia - in a period of two years - was pieced together like a gigantic jigsaw puzzle from approximately 450 square miles of pine and cypress woodlands. One of the most modern training camps anywhere, it is capable of training many thousands of troops in the arts of Twentieth Century warfare and simultaneously taking care of their every need and comfort. "Shoot 'Em Down" is the ominous motto of the camp; and the almost ceaseless BOOM of anti-aircraft guns on the vast Stewart ranges is ample evidence of the singleness of purpose that imbues the camp. The Army Service Forces have a Service Command here under the Fourth Service Command, Atlanta, Ga. This permanent ASF installation, with a slogan of "Serving Always," sees to it that the anti-aircraft troops are properly housed, fed, supplied and equipped at all times. The camp was named after General Daniel Stewart, Revolutionary War hero and doughty Indian fighter who lived in the vicinity of the present reservation. General Stewart, who was a direct ancestor of President Theodore Roosevelt, married the sister of Charlton Hines, pioneer who founded historic Hinesville, the Liberty County seat located one mile from the camp's main entrance. Liberty County gave three signers to the Declaration of Independence, hence the name. Stewart has what is believed to be the largest V-For-Victory in the nation. The camp's headquarters and hutment area is laid out in the shape of a gigantic "V". To the tempo of military music played by AAATC bands, at Retreat, on the firing ranges; at concerts, Camp Stewart is adding its bit to the ever-increasing might of the United Nations that will one day destroy the two remaining members of the anxious Axis.

Camp Stewart, Georgia
Camp Stewart, Georgia
Brief History of Camp Stewart ....... Training recruits to become polished antiaircraft soldiers is the vital business of the South's great Antiaircraft Training Center at Camp Stewart. This vast military reservation, in less than two years, was pieced together like a gigantic jigsaw puzzle from 281,000 acres of south coastal Georgia pine woodlands to make it one of the largest Army camps in the country. One of the most modern posts in the nation, it trains thousands of soldiers and at the same time cares for their every want and comfort. The camp was named after General Daniel Stewart, hero of the Revolutionary war and rugged Indian fighter who was born in the vicinity of the Headquarters Area of the reservation. General Stewart married the sister of Charlton Hines, founder of Hinesville, which is the seat of Liberty County located one mile from the camp's main entrance. General Stewart was the great-great-grandfather of Theodore Roosevelt. Camp Stewart has what is believed to be the largest V-for-Victory in the nation, as its hutment and Headquarters areas are laid out in shape of a huge V; and "Shoot 'Em Down!" is its grim motto. Brigadier General O. L. Spiller, C.A.C., is Commanding General of the AAATC; and Colonel William V. Ochs, CAV., is Post Commander.

Camp Stewart, Georgia - 'The South's' Antiaircraft Training Center
Camp Stewart, Georgia - 'The South's' Antiaircraft Training Center
The Booklet's description of the Camp: ... The Antiaircraft Training Center at Camp Stewart, Georgia, under the command of Brigadier General Earl H. Metzger, is one of the largest military reservations in the country. Created by act of Congress in June, 1940, it embraces approximately 280,000 acres in seven south Georgia counties. The camp was named for General Daniel Stewart, Revolutionary War hero and a native of Liberty County, Georgia, in which the Headquarters and cantonment areas of the military post are situated. First actual construction work on the huge firing area was started in September, 1940. By February 1, 1941, all housing and troop facilities of the camp were virtually completed, after more than 5,000 workers had been employed, hundreds of buildings and tent structures erected and miles of paved roads laid down. The camp was literally carved out of virgin pine and cypress forests of coastal Georgia, yet the builders set a new construction record. Since the first unit arrived at the camp in the fall of 1940, a large number of regiments and separate battalions of A. A. Artillery have been trained in the highly technical phases of antiaircraft warfare, and this work continues at accelerated speed. ........... Format 9" x 6" with 36 pages.

Camp Swift - A Camera Trip Through Camp Swift - Texas
Camp Swift - A Camera Trip Through Camp Swift - Texas
Camp Swift in Brief ....... Situated in the heart of Central Texas, Camp Swift, covering an area in excess of 52,000 acres, lies near the center of a triangle composed of the towns of Bastrop, Elgin and Smithville. Nearest large city is Austin, the State capital, 34 miles away. Camp Swift has been called, by soldiers and officers who have been stationed in numerous camps, one of the nation's model training centers. It is situated on rolling ground, drainage being taken care of naturally. Climatically it is perhaps as nearly ideal as any camp, for while the Texas summer sun is hot, nights are invariably cool, this area being fanned by breezes from the Gulf of Mexico. Winter temperature of the area is moderate. Soldiers of Camp Swift are quartered in comfortable, modern barracks, and the Post affords all needed facilities. These include numerous War Department theatres, five Service Clubs, a number of Post Exchanges, swimming pools, and open air dance pavilions. Transportation between the Camp and the nearby towns is provided by buses. Entertainment of Camp Swift soldiers has become a major activity of residents of the nearby towns, and thousands of men from the Camp visit these places each week end, and have come to recognize Texas hospitality as a very tangible quality. Camp Swift is officially designated as the 1849th Unit, Eighth Service Command, Army Service Forces.

Camp Swift - Texas
Camp Swift - Texas
History of Camp Swift ....... Called the Model Camp of the United States by many officers and enlisted men who have served in other Array stations, Camp Swift is unique in many respects. Its terrain is rolling, affording perfect drainage. In the hottest of Texas summer, it is fanned by breezes from the Gulf of Mexico. Land area of the Camp is approximately 52,000 acres. The entire Government Reservation is fenced, and considerably more than 48 miles of fencing was required for this purpose. The area surrounding the Camp is rich in Texas history. The town of Bastrop, county seat of Bastrop County, derived its name, as did the county, from the Baron De Bastrop, staunch friend of Stephen F. Austin who colonized Texas. The Camino Real, the Royal Road, which in days prior to Texas' independence and statehood, linked the Eastern Tejas area with Mexico, of which Tejas (Spanish spelling for Texas) was then a State. Construction of Camp Swift was achieved in about four months. This tremendous feat was accomplished by a force which at times approximated 12,000 workmen. In this brief time what had been an expanse of woodland and farm land was converted into a modern Army camp, with paved streets, sanitary facilities and utilities, ready to accommodate its first contingent of troops. Colonel Lawrence A. Kurtz, who was designated to command this new Post, reached Camp Swift in April, 1942, accompanied by a small group of officers who constituted his staff. The Post flag was raised for the first time on May 4, 1942, when the Camp was activated. Shortly following that date the first units of troops arrived in Camp Swift. The 95th Infantry Division was activated here on July 15, 1942. Numerous specialized units had been previously activated, and many others were activated following that date. Camp Swift derives its name from the late Major General Eben Swift, a distinguished officer who served his country in the Spanish-American War and later in many parts of the world. Camp Swift is the home station for training purposes of a number of units, including at this time the 97th Infantry Division, Army Ground Troops, Army Special Troops, Air Base Security Units, Army Service Forces, and many specialized groups. Streets of the Camp are lettered and numbered. The principal thoroughfare, leading to the Main Gate is Pershing Boulevard, which runs in a general east-west direction. Streets are numbered and run north and south crossing Pershing Boulevard. Avenues are lettered and run east and west, paralleling Pershing Boulevard. At the northern end of the cantonment area is the section occupied by the Infantry Division now in training. At the southern end is the Station Hospital section. From north to south the cantonment area, that is, the portion of the camp in which there are buildings, stretches approximately five miles.

Camp Tyson - Barrage Balloon Training Center
Camp Tyson - Barrage Balloon Training Center
Camp Tyson, located; in the beautiful Tennessee River basin of Western Tennessee, is the only Barrage Balloon Training Center .in the United States Army. It was named for the late Brigadier General Lawrence Davis Tyson, Tennessee soldier, statesman, educator and patriot. Under the command of Brigadier General John B. Maynard, Camp Tyson is turning out its quota of officers and enlisted men, trained for Barrage Balloon Service of the Coast Artillery Corps. Just a year old it is one of the specialized camps that are helping to supply the necessary military personnel demanded by this critical period of American history.

Camp Van Dorn - A Camera Trip Through Camp Van Dorn
Camp Van Dorn - A Camera Trip Through Camp Van Dorn
History of Camp Van Dorn ....... This is Camp Van Dorn. Its photographic pages reproduce scenes that are etched in our memory of Army Life. Camp Van Dorn, which is located about two miles from Centerville, at one time comprised a number of large plantations, with schools, churches, and cemeteries. While located in the battle area of the Civil War, no major engagements were fought here. Construction was begun in June 1942 and was ready for occupancy on the day of Activation, September 20, 1942. Only the old road from Centerville ran through Camp on that date. Today concrete highways connect Camp with McComb, Natchez, and Baton Rouge. While the Camp residential and work areas form but a small part of the Camp, within its boundaries are many areas for maneuvers as well as artillery and other firing ranges. General Van Dorn, after whom the Camp is named, led a colorful life. Born in Mississippi in 1820, he entered West Point at 16. In the War with Mexico he took part in Scott's Campaign in Mexico, with the 7th Infantry, emerging a Brevet Major. In 1855 he once more distinguished himself against the Comanche and Apache Indians. When, in 1861, Mississippi left the Union, Van Dorn resigned his Commission in the U. S. Army and offered his services to the Confederacy. It was due to his efforts that the first Confederate naval prize, a U. S. steamer, "Star of the West", was captured at Galveston, Texas. The defense of Vicksburg, in 1862, under his brilliant direction resulted in the cutting of Grant's supply line at Holly Springs, thus causing Union forces to withdraw, thereby lifting the siege. His record, both in the service of the U. S. and in the Confederacy, demonstrated his ability as an outstanding leader in military affairs. We of Camp Van Dorn feel that his spirit of leadership and military tactics guides our steps and lends a helping hand in our preparations for the future.

Camp Wheeler - Infantry Replacement Training Center
Camp Wheeler - Infantry Replacement Training Center
Detailed updates coming

Camp Wolters - A Camera Trip Through Camp Wolters
Camp Wolters - A Camera Trip Through Camp Wolters
History of Camp Wolters ....... Here is your Camp Wolters, a photo-record of faces and places to hold for you the memory of your first days in Our Army at this infantry replacement training center. No matter what sort of training you received at Wolters, be it in a rifle company, a heavy weapons company, or any of the specialist outfits, here you will find graphic recollections of you and your buddies at the job, preparing, by sweating and working and fighting, to bring peace to the world. See, also, in this booklet, a pictorial record of your off-duty hours at Camp Wolters: chapel services, dance nights at the service club, with those busloads of lovely young ladies from nearby communities, and scenes reminiscent of hours on the athletic field as you played hard for "B" or "C" company, or for your battalion or regiment. Here, then, for most of you, is an album of familiar scenes to help you recall your first days of training in Uncle Sam's Victory Army as fighting men in the ranks of the Queen of Battle, the United States Infantry. Remember Camp Wolters, deep in the heart of Texas and three miles from Mineral Wells. It stands a tribute to itself in neatness, cleanliness, attractiveness, and training efficiency. Remember, in these scenes, your officers, your non-commissioned officers, and your buddies who were with you on those long marches, night problems, rifle ranges, and other phases of your basic training as YOU began the trek to Victory at Wolters.

Camp Wolters - A Camera Trip Through Camp Wolters II
Camp Wolters - A Camera Trip Through Camp Wolters II
History of Camp Wolters ....... Here is your Camp Wolters, a photo-record of faces and places to hold for you the memory of your first days in Our Army at this infantry replacement training center. No matter what sort of training you received at Walters, be it in a rifle company, a heavy weapons company, or any of the specialist outfits, here you will find graphic recollections of you and your buddies at the |ob, preparing, by sweating and working and fighting, to bring peace to the world. See, also, in this booklet, a pictorial record of your off-duty hours at Camp Wolters; chapel services, dance nights at the service club, with those busloads of lovely young ladies from nearby communities, and scenes reminiscent of hours on the athletic field as you played hard for "B" or "C" company, or for your battalion or regiment. Here, then, for most of you, is an album of familiar scenes to help you recall your first days of training in Uncle Sam's Victory Army as fighting men in the ranks of the Queen of Battles, the United States Infantry. Remember Camp Wolters, deep in the heart of Texas and three miles from Mineral Wells. It stands a tribute to itself in neatness, cleanliness, attractiveness, and training efficiency. Remember, in these scenes, your officers, your non-commissioned officers, and your buddies who were with you on those long marches, night problems, rifle ranges, and other phases of your basic training as YOU began the trek to Victory at Wolters.

Camp Wolters Texas
Camp Wolters Texas
Camp Wolters, named for the late Brigadier General Jacob F. Wolters, is one of the nation's largest Infantry Replacement Centers. Men of Camp Wolters are Infantry soldiers, members of the largest single branch of the Army. During your training here, you will become familiar with many weapons, the rifle, machine gun, mortar, bayonet, hand grenade, and others. When you leave Wolters, you will go to other camps for further training. Your stay at Wolters is short. The training offered you here is like life insurance, the more you take away with you the better off you will be.

Chanute Field - AAF Technical Training Command
Chanute Field - AAF Technical Training Command
Chanute Field was named in honor of Octave Chanute ( 1832-1910 ). Distinguished engineer and pioneer in the theory of aviation. Many of the principles of aerodynamics which he conceived more than a half century ago were employed in the first airplanes built and are fundamentals even today. His name is perpetuated in Chanute Field.

Cherry Point - Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N. C.
Cherry Point - Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N. C.
Built literally out of swampland, the Marine Corps Air Station of Cherry Point, N. C,, has developed swiftly. Construction of its runways did not commence until seventeen days before Pearl Harbor, Now the largest and busiest Marine Corps Air Station, it acts as landlord and housekeeper for attached units. Of these by far the largest is the Third Marine Aircraft Wing. Continuously expanding, the Station has radiated into a series of outlying fields throughout eastern North Carolina. Here young recruits come and receive assignments to aviation duty, or to specialized schools. From here squadrons leave and others form. Their destination - combat.

Chico Army Air Field - A Camera Trip Through Chico Army Air Field
Chico Army Air Field - A Camera Trip Through Chico Army Air Field
Spring Mud of the Sacramento Valley oozed ankle deep under the rain on an April day in 1942 when the advance echelon of Air Corps men reached the spot that was to become Chico Army Air Field. The advance echelon had come by motor convoy from Moffett Field, where the flying school was getting ready to move in order to make room for the Navy. Field kitchens were set up, tents were pitched, and the men started the big job of building a flying field. April 29 saw the first training flight from the new post, and already the field was swinging into high gear. By May 23 all personnel and every plane had moved north from Moffett and the school was officially on its own. Since the day of activation Chico Army Air Field has trained hundreds of cadets, many of them now flying with combat outfits on fighting fronts throughout the world. They have received virtually every decoration possible. But the men and officers of the post have contributed more to the war effort than flyers. They gave Chico Army Air Field the distinction of being first in the Army Air Forces to have 100 per cent of its personnel purchasing War Bonds on the payroll savings plan. A full ten per cent of the field's payroll goes into War Bonds. Recognition for outstanding achievement came before the base was even six months old. The field was cited for "an outstanding contribution to the war effort" as pilots and cadets completed a tool of 94,355 flying hours here and at Moffett without a fatal training accident. This total was increased until seventeen months had elapsed without a fatality. Chico's contributions to the war and to the peace to come are many. Its contributions of the next year will be recorded in the skies over Europe, and, we hope, Japan.

Craig Field - Selma Alabama
Craig Field - Selma Alabama
On May 2, 1941, the following news release went out over the nation's press wire service: "SELMA, ALA., May 2 - As determined and void of frills as a volunteer - which she.really is - this one-time arsenal of the confederacy opens tomorrow as an "arsenal of democracy" the largest flying field in the United States, civilian or military. It is a new unit of the Southeast Air Corps Training Center, where flying cadets will get advanced schooling in the handling of multi-mile-a-minute pursuit planes - the kind that go up to intercept bombers, beat off machine gunners" So it was that Craig started its history. In slightly over a year, Craig had attained expanded size indicative of the growing strength of the country's air arm. When on August 1, 1942, Col. Julian B. Haddon celebrated his first anniversary as commandant of the post, Craig boasted of a post mechanic school, a sheet metal school, classes in radio, link trainer, map reading, meteorology, chemical warfare, and various other technical branches of Air Force work - all in addition to its regular program of training ever-increasing groups of advanced cadets. From its very start, Craig earned for itself a reputation for pioneering - new and advanced methods of teaching together with more thorough and comprehensive training techniques - these were Craig Field's contribution to the Air Force's pursuit school program. Craig Field was named in honor of Lieut. Bruce Craig, a native of Selma, who died while serving as a test engineer on a new Army bomber. The post is located on-Highway 80, about 5 miles East of the city of Selma, Alabama.

Drew Field Tampa Florida
Drew Field Tampa Florida
In a sod-covered cow pasture, once spotted with palmetto growth and pine trees, the United States Army has built a new nest for its war birds, Drew Field. Paved streets have replaced swampy marshland. Barracks and hutments now stand where palmettos and pines grew. From an abandoned municipal airport has emerged Drew Field, a modern Army air base and flying school, built to train fliers and soldiers for the War of Survival. As it is today, as it will be in the future, Drew Field is a miracle of Army building, symbol of the transformation that has taken place all through the nation as the American people gird themselves for world war. Named for John H. Drew, Tampa contractor and real estate operator who first bought the land and turned the subdivision into a private landing field, Drew Field was acquired by the City of Tampa in 1928 for a municipal airport. Little was done to develop the field, however, until the government took over and made plans for militarization of the site. Then things happened. And rapidly. In December, 1940, Lt. Henry M. Salley, engineers corps, was ordered, from MacDill Field to supervise preparation of the abandoned airport. Under his direction, administration buildings and barracks were built, and on January 16, 1941, Capt. James C. Hardwick, Air Forces, and a detachment of men from MacDill Field, were detailed to; duty at Drew. Colonel Melvin B. Asp (then Lt. Colonel) was assigned to Drew Field May 7, 1941, and designated commanding officer of the field which was still a sub-station of MacDill. On June 12, 1941, the Third Interceptor Command, General Frank commanding, arrived. On July 12, the Thirteenth Transport Squadron. Two days later Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron, Third Interceptor Command, was activated. The work of transforming Drew Field into a modern air base continued. On August 18, ceremonies celebrating the starting of work on the runways took place. The first pouring of concrete was attended by Army officials, political leaders and residents of St. Petersburg, Clearwater and Tampa. From the first, the present and the future of Drew Field were linked with Tampa and other cities of the bay area. As the first buckets of concrete were poured, Colonel Asp placed three bricks, one each from St. Petersburg, Tampa and Clearwater, into the fresh compound. "These three cities are closely tied in with Drew Field in a social, business and recreational manner," he said. "Let us hope these cities will continue to be bound in the future as closely as these three bricks will be bound in this indestructible concrete that will soon cover them." September 15, 1941, Drew Field was divorced from MacDill Field and assumed the status of an independent air base. As such, it continued to grow. Seven days after Pearl Harbor, 1,700 men arrived from Camp Wheeler, Ga. In January, 1942, it became a school center for air warning service. In May, Plant Field was added as a sub-base of Drew. Today construction work continues without a stop. As the construction goes on, the military population grows. In the green-painted barracks, and in row after row of hutments which are rapidly replacing the Tent City of other days thousands of soldiers now training for the highly technical work of the Air Forces and the Signal Corps are housed.

Duncan Field - A Camera Trip Through Duncan Field
Duncan Field - A Camera Trip Through Duncan Field
The Story of Duncan Field ....... The name, Duncan Field, is as well known throughout America as any Army Air Force Field in the country. It is situated in the heart of the San Antonio Flying Country. Grouped around it are the Training Centers for a large part of the Army Air Force. This Field has many important functions in this war. The largest part of its operations are concerned with the maintenance and repair of combat ships. Besides the Army Personnel there is a large civilian personnel working day and night on the vital job of "keeping them flying." This book attempts to tell part of the story of each man's activities here: the comfortable living quarters, the soldierly routine, the recreational facilities, the opportunities for church going, good libraries for enlisted men and Officers and, of course, the vital story of training to make the world's best Air Force and to keep them aloft. .... 32 pages

Ellington Field - A Camera Trip Through Ellington Field
Ellington Field - A Camera Trip Through Ellington Field
History of the Field ....... Spanning closely the life of an American, the history of Ellington Field, Texas, is easily divided into two sections, that of a youthful fledgling during World War I, and that of a mature man with great productive power in its greater role in World War II. It is located about midway between Houston and Galveston near the Gulf of Mexico. The airfield was first established early in 1917 by the War Department, and named for Second Lieutenant Eric L. Ellington, a pioneer of military aviation who was the victim of a crash of a pusher-type plane near San Diego, Cal., in 1913. Hundreds of pilots were trained at the historic field during this period of its existence, including Col. W. H. Reid, now commanding the new Ellington, and countless others now high in military and civilian aviation. It was abandoned in 1 920 by the War Department but a few months later re-opened as a base for a pursuit group and remained in use until about five years later when it was again abandoned. Once again, in 1 940, the historic acres of the air field assumed a heroic role, and in a period of a few months a giant Aviation Cadet training field was established that was to make history. Originally intended as a bomber training site, the War Department in its expansion program also included the instruction of bombardiers and several classes of pilots skilled in multi-motor operation and also groups of navigators ready to assist in the aerial operations in fact the first of the now world-famous "combat crews" were graduated. As the United States continued the gigantic expansion of its Army Air Force training program, Ellington Field came to employ an even greater role. Today it not only supplies the advanced training for hundreds of pilots in multi-motor plane operations, but it also equips literally thousands of bombardiers and navigators with the fundamental technical knowledge required in one of the largest pre-flight schools in the nation. Yes, combat crews are cradled here and the Axis sees their maturity - almost daily accounts in news dispatches concerning some graduate of Ellington Field supplies sufficient testimony. Ellington Field continues its growth, cognizant of its great heritage, proud of its present achievements, and hopeful of its future in a peaceful world.

Farragut, Idaho Naval Training Station
Farragut, Idaho Naval Training Station
The name "Farragut" was chosen for this station by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Commander-In-Chief of all U. S. Armed Forces. No greater tribute could be paid to the First Admiral .... No greater inspiration to the men who serve after him. David Glascow Farragut started his career as a midshipman at the age of nine. He commanded a prize with ability when only twelve years old. In 1824 he was in command of the U.S.S. Ferret. He was Rear-Admiral in 1862, Vice-Admiral in 1864, and Admiral in 1866, the first full Admiral of the U. S. Navy, an office created for him by Congress. Somewhat under middle height, of unusual strength, agile, athletic, and a skilled swordsman, he was easily approachable, yet in his bearing there was dignity without stiffness. Early in 1862 Farragut was appointed to the Command of the West Gulf Blocading Squadron with orders to " .... proceed up the Mississippi River and reduce the defenses which guard the approach to New Orleans . . . ." Before dawn on the morning of August 5, 1864, he issued his carefully planned orders to the Captains of the fleet of fourteen wooden ships, four iron clad monitors, and ten small gun boats. First in line was the heavily armed "Brooklyn," followed by the Admiral's "Hartford." One of the leading monitors, the "Tecumseh," in her anxiety to engage the enemy, crossed the mine field, struck a torpedo and sank within a few minutes. This was the great moment of Farragut's life. Without a moment's hesitation he swung his own ship clear of the hesitating "Brooklyn" and shouted, "DAMN THE TORPEDOES .... FULL SPEED AHEAD," and anchored triumphantly above the fort. ....... Farragut Naval Training Station includes the following training camps: ... Camp Waldron ........ Camp Ward ....... Camp Bennion ....... Camp Hill ........ Camp Peterson ....... and Camp Scott.

Fletcher Field - Clarksdale, Mississippi
Fletcher Field - Clarksdale, Mississippi
In the Spring of 1942, the United States Government let a contract to the Clarksdale School of Aviation for the establishment and operation of a primary flying school to be located approximately eight miles north of Clarksdale, Mississippi, on U.S. Highway 61. It was in the early part of July when the school received its first class, Class 43-A. Thus was born the 69th Army Air Forces Flying Training Detachment. It is here that an Aviation Cadet receives his long awaited flying training. It is here, after months of basic military training, college training, and pre-flight training, that the "Zombie" makes that never to be forgotten solo flight. In future years, as these pages are turned, it is earnestly hoped that this class book will bring back "alma mater" memories of Reveille, Mess, Ground School, Physical Training, Flying, Retreat, Barracks Life, and Open Post.

Fort Belvoir - A Camera Trip Through Fort Belvoir
Fort Belvoir - A Camera Trip Through Fort Belvoir
Click on Image for story of the History of Fort Belvoir.

Fort Benjamin Harrison - A Camera Trip Through Fort Benjamin Harrison
Fort Benjamin Harrison - A Camera Trip Through Fort Benjamin Harrison
Detailed updates coming

Fort Benning - A Camera Trip Through Fort Benning
Fort Benning - A Camera Trip Through Fort Benning
A 32 page photo booklet of a 95 picture tour of Fort Benning. Format 6" x 9"

Fort Benning Georgia Pictorial Revue
Fort Benning Georgia Pictorial Revue
For more than twenty years the Infantry School at Fort Benning, Georgia, has been implanting the qualities of leadership and superior military knowledge in thousands of officers and enlisted specialists of the Army of the United States. Today, in the crisis of war, it has also been given the tremendous task of training thousands of soldiers to become officers of infantry. The basic jump training of parachute troops is under Infantry School supervision. The vital Infantry Board is housed in the school building and works in close cooperation with the school. Over an area of more than 150,000 acres, on all forms of terrain, under every conceivable condition of warfare, the Infantry School goes forward with its task of helping mold the greatest fighting force ever known to man. The Infantry School was first established in October, 1918, on the Macon Road about three miles east of Columbus. Previously it had been known in successive stages as the School of Musketry in Monterey, California, and the School of Small Arms Fire at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. After several months in its Columbus location the school moved to its present position, nine miles south of Columbus, on the site of the old Bussey plantation. The School has numbered many distinguished soldiers at its head, among them General George C. Marshall, present Chief of Staff, who served a tour of duty as Assistant Commandant, and Major General Courtney C. Hodges, head of the newly-created Replacement and School Command, who has been a recent Commandant of the School. Present Commandant is Brigadier General Leven C. Allen, formerly of the Army General Staff in Washington. The motto of the Infantry School is "Follow Me," the prescribed command given by the infantry squad or platoon leader when the time comes for direct action against an enemy. These words, implying so much of direct leadership, indicate the position of the school in the army structure. It is an institution whose responsibility is to keep abreast of all the many new developments that are constantly occurring in a branch of the army called "The Queen of Battles."

Fort Bliss - Picture Parade of Fort Bliss, Texas
Fort Bliss - Picture Parade of Fort Bliss, Texas
History of Fort Bliss ....... Fort Bliss, near the famed Rio Grande, bordering our Mexican neighbors to the south, has long been one of America's most colorful posts and bears the scars of many passing armies. Spanish troops under Cabeza de Vaca first visited the region as early as 1536, but the earliest American soldiers to bivouac here were with General Doniphan more than 300 years later, in 1846. The War Department officially created "El Paso Post" on September 14, 1849; then in 1854 changed the name to "Fort Bliss" in honor of Brevet Major William Wallace Smith Bliss, who had been an extremely capable soldier and secretary under Zachary Taylor. The Post was occupied at various times by both Union and Confederate armies during the Civil War. On its present site, however, Fort Bliss was first completed in 1893 and placed under the command of Col. H. M. Lazelle. Little of military significance occurred until the border troubles of 1914 caused a huge expansion. These also uncovered a brilliant military leader here, John J. Pershing, who was later to become General of the Armies. In World War I days, the Post reached a peak of 60,000 men being sprawled for miles along the jagged slopes of Mt. Franklin. Fort Bliss became the home of the 1st Cavalry Division on August 31, 1921, and was soon famed throughout the world for its glamorous, booted "men of the saddle." The Division was converted this year into a speedy, hard-hitting mechanized force, and has been praised by authorities as the "best damned soldiers that ever trod the face of the earth." At the present time, however, Fort Bliss has expanded far beyond the Cavalry. It now has one of the world's largest Antiaircraft Artillery Training Centers, a Reception Center, and field forces of the Third Army. Units trained at Fort Bliss have already been in action on Bataan (the famous New Mexico 200th Coast Artillery), at Dutch Harbor and Milne Bay, in Tunisia and Sicily, and in far-off Burma. Other units form part of the defenses on our east and west coasts, and of the European, North African, East Indian, Southwest Pacific and Alaskan Defense Commands. Attached to the large Fort Bliss Station Hospital are "General Hospital" staffs which get their training for overseas work as a function of the Army Service Forces. Another Army Service Forces unit on the Post is the Ordnance Service Command Shop No. 7, a mammoth repair and maintenance organization for Servicing military vehicles from outlying posts all over the surrounding area. Fort Bliss dovetails into El Paso, a thriving, prosperous city of 140,000 which combines the bustle of modern business with the picturesque simplicity of Latin America. Close by is William Beaumont General Hospital, Army Service Forces installation to which soldier-patients come from every section of America for prolonged hospitalization and special medical care. In 1942, the Training Center here took over from the Air Corps the popular radio-directed target plane. These planes are flown, serviced and completely maintained by Antiaircraft personnel. From this AAATC station, groups, including Naval officers and men, have been trained and sent to their respective stations where they, in turn, have broadened the use of the radio-directed target plane to their own purposes. Airborne Antiaircraft units, which have given a splendid account of themselves on every one of our battle fronts to date, were initially activated at the AAATC, Fort Bliss, in 1942. The activation of Airborne units at the Training Center has continued to expand greatly in the past calendar year. One of America's largest and most important posts today. Fort Bliss is now commanded by Colonel John K. Brown, a snappy West Pointer who served here originally in the rollicking pre-war era and established himself as one of America's greatest polo players, as well as becoming an authority on horse shows and horse judging. It is particularly fitting that in the grim seriousness of the present fight-to-a-finish, one of the old Cavalry's most famed horsemen has been brought back to assume command, the boots and the riding crop closeted temporarily away, but the quaint charm and traditions of an earlier Fort Bliss still lurking indelibly above and beyond the rush of emergent training.

Fort Bragg
Fort Bragg
A 28 page photo booklet of a descriptive picture story of the First thru Fifth Regiments at Fort Bragg. Format 8-3/8" x 10-7/8"

Fort Custer - Michigan
Fort Custer - Michigan
Fort Custer is located six miles west of Battle Creek and 18 miles east of Kalamazoo, Mich. During World War I, thousands of troops were trained on the site of the present Fort, then known as Camp Custer. Following the war most of the buildings were dismantled and the site continued to serve as a summer training camp. In August of 1941, Camp Custer was renamed Fort Custer and designated as a permanent Army post. The first barracks completed were occupied by troops on November 20th, 1940. A Reception Center was established and the balance of the buildings were soon occupied by the Fifth Division which was scheduled for combat training. With the completion of training of the Fifth Division, the 94th was activated and started training at this site. It was, however, moved to another locality when the Fort was established as the HOME OF THE CORPS OF MILITARY POLICE. The Military Police train on terrain and with equipment that is ideal for the highly specialized work that they perform. The modern and ever busy ranges include facilities for the many weapons employed in training; inclusive art the machine gun, the mortar, shotgun, rifles, pistol, etc. Also in continuous use are special training courses such as the Infiltration Course, The Obstacle Course, Jungle Course, The Anti-mechanized Defense Course, The Demolition Course and Mine Field Area, The Street Fighting Course and Live Hand Grenade Courses. In addition there are the Debarkation Nets, Gas Chambers, Prisoner of War Enclosures and training aids too numerous to mention. Fort Custer comprises many types of training and schools for specialists. The First Training Regiment is charged with the mission of providing basic, technical and tactical training for individual soldiers. The Second Training Regiment trains companies and Military Police Battalions for duty in any desired theatre of operations. Such organizations include Post Camp and Station, Prisoner of War Processing and Escort Guard Companies. The Provost Marshal General's School is the service school for the Corps of Military Police and provides specialized training for officers, officer candidates and selected enlisted men. In addition there are such Auxiliary Troops as Quartermaster and Medical Sanitary Units. Here, also, are located two companies of the Woman's Army Corps known as the WAC Detachment. Appropriately stationed at the Fort is the Military Police Board which carries on extensive research of Military Police equipment and methods of use, as utilized by the Corps of Military Police; also the Advisory Liaison Branch of the Military Police Division, Provost Marshal General's Office. It is hoped this picture record of Fort Custer will serve as a permanent "memory-log" of the Army training period here.

Fort George G. Meade - About Fort George G. Meade, Maryland
Fort George G. Meade - About Fort George G. Meade, Maryland
Condensed History of Fort George G. Meade, MD. ....... Fort George G. Meade in Anne Arundel County, Maryland, bears the name of the distinguished officer who fought in the Seminole, Mexican and Civil Wars and commanded the victorious Federal forces at Gettysburg. Situated in a beautiful, rolling country, the 25,000-acre reservation has an elevation varying from 150 to 300 feet above sea level. Excellent highways and two railroads connect the post with Baltimore and Washington, respectively sixteen and thirty miles distant. One of sixteen World War cantonments of the National Army, Camp Meade, as it was then known, was started in 1917 on ground over which wagon trains passed to join Braddock's Ill-fated campaign in the French and Indian War and Lafayette rushed reinforcements to crown Washington's success at Yorktown. Here in 1814 was assembled poorly equipped militia to defend unsuccessfully the young nation's capital. Over the reservation In 1844 passed the crude single strand of wire through which was tapped Morse's telegraph message "What Hath God Wrought?" The 79th Division, in 1917-18, was the major unit to use Camp Meade, which eventually had 1,460 temporary buildings to accommodate 42,000 men. Following the war, Camp Meade was used successively as a demobilization center, tank center and Infantry post. It was particularly active each summer with C.M.T.C. and R.O.T.C. training. The reservation in 1928 was made a regular army post and designated Fort Leonard Wood, but the following year, took Its present name. The temporary buildings were replaced by permanent brick structures of Colonial Maryland architecture. Post Headquarters is a reproduction of Dough-oregon Manor, home of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, last surviving signer of the Declaration of Independence. In 1940 the new cantonment area was started and additional land purchased. More than 2,000 frame barracks and other buildings have been erected, Including a 1500-bed hospital. Here the 29th and 76th Infantry Divisions trained while scores of other units - signal, ordnance, medical, quartermaster, tank, tank destroyer, mechanized cavalry, coast artillery - occupied the permanent section. Full facilities for all arms were installed to make an outstanding training center. Meanwhile Fort Meade became a major recruit reception center through which 400,000 men have poured. Recently the cantonment section became Army Ground Forces Replacement Depot No. 1. Other Important installations include the army's oldest Bakers and Cooks School, a Prisoner of War Camp, Internal Security Training Center and Special Service Unit Training Center. On the post are a dozen recreation halls with stages for assemblies, lectures and entertainments. There are 4 service clubs with commodious dance floors, lounges, cafeterias and libraries. In conjunction with them are operated 3 guest houses for the convenience of wives, mothers and children. A huge gymnasium, athletic fields and 3 swimming pools afford additional recreational facilities. The post has six motion picture theatres equipped with stages and an amphitheatre. There are twelve chapels throughout the post and two Red Cross headquarters. Other conveniences include the post laundry, bakery, cleaning and pressing shop, barber shops, telegraph and telephone offices, express agency, two post offices, a bank and twenty-two "P.X's" and a weekly newspaper, The Fort Meade Post. Meade's story is continued pictorially in the following pages.

Fort Jackson - A Camera Trip Through Fort Jackson
Fort Jackson - A Camera Trip Through Fort Jackson
Detailed updates coming

Fort Lawton
Fort Lawton
General information and Informational Guide Map to Fort Lawton Staging Area, 1 May 1945

Fort McClellan - Fort McClellan in Review
Fort McClellan - Fort McClellan in Review
Detailed updates coming

Fort Sam Houston - A Camera Trip Through Fort Sam Houston
Fort Sam Houston - A Camera Trip Through Fort Sam Houston
Named in honor of Gen. Sam Houston, the illustrious patriot who commanded the forces which gave Texas its freedom, and who was its first president, The Post of Fort Sam Houston ranks as one of this Nation's leading military establishments. Today it is for the third time within its history training and sending men into battle in their country's defense. Fort Sam Houston, located at historic San Antonio, has a career which goes back to December 22, 1879, when its first permanent structure, the Quadrangle, was completed. This edifice still stands, and is today the headquarters for the Third Army. Despite the military bustle, the Quadrangle court still has a sylvan atmosphere with deer, swans, ducks and peacocks making their peaceful abode there. The Post saw its first war in the Spanish-American conflict of 1898 when, besides sending most of its troops off to war, it provisioned the Rough Riders being trained in San Antonio by Col. Theodore Roosevelt. Even before this it had served in many combat missions by providing troops to put down Indian uprisings. In 1886, the Apache medicine man, Geronimo; his son, Chappa, Chief Natchez and other Indian warriors captured by American troops in Arizona were brought to Fort Sam Houston for safe-keeping while en route to a camp in Florida. In 1909 the post was the proud host to the President of the United States, William Howard Taft, who came here to dedicate the Post Chapel. Fort Sam Houston was a cradle of military aviation. In 1910, a hangar was built here for an airplane which was flown by a young lieutenant named Benjamin Foulois, later to become a major general and chief of the Air Corps. The post continued to expand, covering more and more acres, with buildings being frequently added to serve the growing garrison. In 1916 a National Guard division was mobilized here for border duty. It was under the command of Major General Funston. With this Nation's entry into World War I, Fort Sam Houston became one of the country's leading army training camps, expanding to include a 2,118-acre cantonment area named Camp Travis. During the years of peace between World Wars I and II this post continued to serve the Nation well, its officers and men constantly engaged in studying and practicing the newest arts of war, developing new tactics and improving old. Today the post is again doing its part to send to the battlefronts men trained to be not the equal but the superior of our enemies.

Fort Sheridan - A Camera Trip Through Fort Sheridan
Fort Sheridan - A Camera Trip Through Fort Sheridan
The following periodic announcement issued by Fort Sheridan is descriptive of the Post's major contribution to the Second World War. . . . "Antiaircraft fire will create a danger zone on Lake Michigan within a radius of 12 miles of Fort Sheridan and upwards (aloft) for six miles. Air and lake craft should avoid this area." Here, in an ideal setting for such training, gun crews of the Coast Artillery specialize in antiaircraft gunnery. They are trained in the intricacies of range finding, gun emplacements and the rapid handling of the most modern and powerful antiaircraft guns. Their completion of this course will fit them to assume the protection of allied installations throughout the World. Another of the major activities at the post is the processing of recruits from Wisconsin and some induction board districts of northern Illinois in Fort Sheridan's Recruit Reception Center. There "rookies" are issued uniforms for the first time and inoculated against disease before moving to training centers. In addition the post has two schools - one for cooks, bakers and mess sergeants and the other, the Ordnance Automotive School, where soldiers learn motor maintenance of all wheeled vehicles. Civil disorders in the city of Chicago were responsible for the establishment of the venerable army post on the north shore of Lake Michigan. Following violence accompanying the nation-wide rail road strike of 1877 and the Haymarket riot of 1886, a group of citizens of Chicago and the North Shore presented to the government 632.5 acres in Lake County, Ill. It was accepted by the War Department Nov. 19, 1887. During the first World War, the post was an officers training camp. Later it became a general hospital. Infantry and cavalry have trained here but since 1924 it has been a training center for antiaircraft units of the Coast Artillery.

Fort Sill
Fort Sill
History of Fort Sill ....... Fort Sill, the U. S. Army's only Field Artillery School, is rich in Indian lore and the tradition of American soldiers of the plains country. It dates back to 1869, when Gen. Phil Sheridan selected the site as his base of operations in dealing with the Indians. He named the camp in honor of his West Point classmate Brig. Gen. Joshua W. Sill, who was killed December 31, 1862, while leading his troops into the Battle of Stone River, Tennessee. If General Sheridan had remained in charge of the camp, there likely would have been little trouble with the Indians, but a group of peace-loving Quakers was assigned the job of managing frontier affairs. Chiefs Satanta, Satank, Big Bear, Lone "Wolf, and Geronimo created plenty of trouble - especially old Chief Geronimo. In 1910 the late Capt. Dan T. Moore was sent to Fort Sill to establish an Artillery School of Fire. The first class was held September 15, 1911, with 14 captains and 22 noncoms as "students." Then came the first World War, and artillerymen by the thousands arrived for technical training in the use of big guns. The site now occupied by the Replacement Center became Camp Doniphan, where the 35th and 36th divisions were mobilized. In 1917 Post Field was established and named in honor of Lt. Henry B. Post, who was killed in 1914 while attempting to set a new altitude record. Now Fort Sill carries on in another war. Student officers, officer candidates, and enlisted specialists are busy with their training, training that already has been proved. For after Bataan, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, referring to the present method of massing artillery fire by use of a fire-direction center connected with all available observation posts, said: "I can make no suggestions for the improvement of the methods taught at Fort Sill." Even so, research experts here are seeking new improvements to increase the fire power of America's armaments. For they know war only serves to prove the motto of the Field Artillery School, "Cedat Fortuna Peritis", Skill Is Better Than Luck.

Fort Sill - A Camera Trip Through Fort Sill
Fort Sill - A Camera Trip Through Fort Sill
History of Fort Sill ....... Fort Sill, established in 1869 by General P. H. Sheridan, figures prominently in the History of Oklahoma and the development of the West. Now the location of the Field Artillery School, the site first was visited by forces of the United States Army in the summer of 1834, when Colonel Henry Dodge camped in the vicinity for a conference with the Comonche Indians. During the following 15 years, the Wichita Indians lived in a village of grass houses where the Field Artillery School now stands. Captain Randolph B. Marcy, during his Red River explorations in 1852, stopped in the locality where Fort Sill later was erected, and urged that a military post be built there. Other explorers made similar recommendations. Definite action, however, was not taken by the government until 1869. At that time General Sheridan declared that the Indians were imperfectly subdued and that a military post in the area was necessary. During the first week of January, 1869, General Sheridan moved troops from Fort Cobb to Fort Sill. The expedition under Sheridan consisted of four companies of the 10th Cavalry, General George A. Ouster's 7th Cavalry, the 19th Cavalry, and two companies of the 6th Infantry. Custer's regiment and the Kansas volunteers departed in March, but the other troops remained under command of Colonel B. H. Grier-son to construct the new post. Shortly after the arrival of the expedition. Colonel Grierson selected the site of the present Old Post. Nearby were sufficient water, wood, forage and building rock. Adjutant Samuel I. Woodward was directed to kill some buffaloes to supply the command with fresh meat. The chase extended over the Adams Hill - Arbuckle Hill area, where over fifty buffaloes were killed in two hours. Comanche chiefs were invited to dine with the officers. In return for this courtesy, they staged a scalp dance. The camp first was called Camp Wichita - in honor of the Indians whose village had been there, later it was known as Camp Medicine Bluff. On August 1, 1869, General Sheridan officially named the new post Fort Sill, in honor of General Joshua W. Sill, a West Point Classmate, who was killed December 31,1862, at the battle of Stone River, Tenn. Early in 1870, construction of the permanent post was begun. Most of the labor was performed by the troops. Construction was interrupted frequently by raiding Kiowas and Comanches. A large stone corral - loopholed for defense - was built to provide protection for livestock. In that same year a stone blockhouse was built on Signal Mountain, the same one now used as an artillery reference point. The old post guardhouse, which served as a dungeon for many of the worst Indians (including Geronimo), now is the Field Artillery museum. The 29th Battery of Field Artillery, the first field artillery unit stationed here, came to Fort Sill on January 9, 1902. The separation of the Field Artillery and Coast Artillery in 1907 made it necessary to introduce some uniform system of instruction for Field Artillery officers. The result was the establishment in 1911 of the School of Fire for Field Artillery at Fort Sill. The post then was enlarged by construction of what now is known as the New Post - located west of the Old Post and southeast of Medicine Bluff. The school's troops and instructors were sent to Texas because of troubles on the Mexican border in 1916 and for a year the school did not function. In 1917, as a result of our entry into World War I, the School of Fire was revived and enlarged. At the time of the Armistice more than 1,500 student officers were being graduated every twelve weeks. In 1919, the Field Artillery School was reorganized and continued for the peace-time army. After 35 disastrous fires of incendiary origin, started by excitement-hungry soldiers during 1924-26, funds were appropriated in 1933 and 1934 for the present new Administration building and permanent barracks for troops, as well as officers' and non-commissioned officers' quarters. The permanent post itself consists of the Academic, Concurrent, Old Post and New Post areas and Post Field. Temporary construction south of the main Post includes the Field Artillery Replacement Training Center, Cantonment Hospital, Reception Center and the 112th and 349th Field Artillery and the Cantonment areas. The old stone post of the Indian days stands unchanged in general appearance, although the buildings have modernized equipment and interiors.

Fort Sill - Field Artillery School
Fort Sill - Field Artillery School
Detailed updates coming

Gardner Field - A Camera Trip Through Gardner Field
Gardner Field - A Camera Trip Through Gardner Field
Detailed updates coming

Great Lakes Naval Training Station
Great Lakes Naval Training Station
A 32 page photo booklet of a picture tour of the Great Lakes Naval Training Station. Format 8-1/4" x 11"

Great Lakes Picture Book
Great Lakes Picture Book
A 52 page photo booklet of a 101 picture tour of the Great Lakes Naval Training Station. Format 8-1/2" x 11"

Greenville Army Flying School - Greenville, Mississippi
Greenville Army Flying School - Greenville, Mississippi
Detailed updates coming

Gulfport Field - Mississippi
Gulfport Field - Mississippi
Gulfport Field, Mississippi, an Airplane Mechanics' School of the Technical Training Command of the Army Air Forces, is one of the latest United States Army installations and was designed to provide a flow of trained mechanics to the nation's fighting forces. It was established in April, 1942, under the command of Colonel Alfred L. Jewett. It is one of the installations of the practical program of the Army Air Forces Technical Training Command, and was established to prepare mechanics quickly and efficiently to meet a national emergency. This is the second station to be established on the Mississippi Gulf Coast by Major General Walter R. Weaver, commanding the Army Air Forces Technical Training Command. Within its first year Gulfport Field won the coveted Third District Army Air Forces Technical Training Command Banner for Efficiency, awarded by Major General Jacob E. Fickel, Third District Commander. Gulfport Field is simplified and streamlined for effective service. Through the co-operation of capable officers and responsive men, who take pride in their station, it is being constantly improved. Under constructive leadership it has already graduated thousands of airplane mechanics who look back upon their training experiences with patriotic appreciation and into the future with high purpose. The role of airplane mechanic is most technical. Upon his skill depends the lives of flying members of the crew. His task in the Great Adventure is less dramatic than activities performed by some soldiers, but it is just as essential. The airplane mechanic does the groundwork that inspires little poetry and less song, but his is the exacting responsibility of keeping the planes aloft on their mission of victory. Through his labors and devotion he is in the midst of every conflict. He answers his country's call to the colors in a fighting spirit and, in the performance of his arduous duties, he lifts our nation to new glory as the American Eagle spreads winning wings to a greater destiny.

Gunter Field Alabama
Gunter Field Alabama
Reveille ....... Gunter Field was the first basic flying school activated in the Southeast Army Air Forces Training Center. The field, coming into being on August 27, 1940, was named in honor of William Adams Gunter, Mayor of Montgomery, Alabama, for 27 years. It was through his patriotism and interest in military aviation that the municipal airport was turned over to the Army Air Forces for use as a military post. The first class of aviation cadets reported for basic training on November 28, 1940, Five weeks after this first class, the second class began their training in the basic phases of flying. Ever since that time, at five week intervals, aviation cadets have entered Gunter's gates, received their training, and graduated into advanced flying schools, from there to win their wings. On the following pages you will see Gunter Field as it appears today ... its men, its planes, its buildings. You will see pilots and cadets in the skies, men preparing for combat. You will see mechanics, the men behind the man in the sky. You will see soldiers at work, at play, living in their Army home, fulfilling their patriotic duty, preparing themselves and others for battle in the clouds.

Gunter Field Alabama II
Gunter Field Alabama II
Reveille ....... Gunter Field was the first basic flying school activated in the Southeast Army Air Forces Training Center. The field, coming into being on August 27, 1940, was named in honor of William Adams Gunter, Mayor of Montgomery, Alabama, for 27 years. It was through his patriotism and interest in military aviation that the municipal airport was turned over to the Army Air Forces for use as a military post. The first class of aviation cadets reported for basic training on November 28, 1940, Five weeks after this first class, the second class began their training in the basic phases of flying. Ever since that time, at five week intervals, aviation cadets have entered Gunter's gates, received their training, and graduated into advanced flying schools, from there to win their wings. On the following pages you will see Gunter Field as it appears today ... its men, its planes, its buildings. You will see pilots and cadets in the skies, men preparing for combat. You will see mechanics, the men behind the man in the sky. You will see soldiers at work, at play, living in their Army home, fulfilling their patriotic duty, preparing themselves and others for battle in the clouds.

Hammer Field - A Camera Trip Through Hammer Field
Hammer Field - A Camera Trip Through Hammer Field
The History of Hammer Field ....... Situated in the beautiful California valley of San Joaquin, near Fresno, Hammer Field is an ideal setting for the heavy air traffic that it accommodates. Here various organizations of the Army Air Forces are in training for the missions they are to perform in this war and the field is a beehive of bustling men and roaring planes. The field was named in honor of Lieutenant Earl M. Hammer, a native of California, who became a member of Squadron 84 of the Royal Flying Corps, the predecessor of the present Royal Air Force of the British Empire. He was the first Californian killed in action in the Air Forces in World War I. Lieutenant Hammer was shot down March 19, 1918 about five miles behind the German lines in the Argonne area. A few hours afterwards, a German aviator dropped a note over the Allied lines saying Hammer had met his death. However, other members of his squadron believed they had seen him land his ship and it was not until some time after the armistice that it was established definitely that he had been killed. At the personal request of General John J. Pershing, a search was made for his grave and it was found between those of two German aviators in a small French village. His grave was moved to the Argonne Cemetery. Twenty three years after young Hammer was shot down, almost to the day, on March 17, 1941, the ground was broken for Hammer Field and it was activated very shortly thereafter. Although much of the operations naturally can not be disclosed we do attempt to illustrate in this book much of the daily activities and life of a soldier at this Base. It is a busy day at best from early morning till taps at night. Yet there are many facilities to be enjoyed by the boys here. There are comfortable day rooms to relax in where all types of clubroom recreations are available. There is a fine theatre, a good Chapel which is well attended, swimming pools and ample sports fields. Although there's lots of workthe boys' happiness, both spiritually and mentally, is carefully developed.

Harlingen - Hags - Army Gunnery School
Harlingen - Hags - Army Gunnery School
The Men Behind the triggers of the Army Air Forces ....... Army Air Force Soldiers here are training to live in glass houses and still throw stuff more dangerous than stones. At this school in the near-tropical Rio Grande Valley, where a Gulf breeze mixes orange blossom scents with powder smells, soldiers learn to sit in plexiglass bomber blisters and keep would-be attackers at arm's length while pilots and bombardiers do their jobs undisturbed. The brand of shooting taught here is known as "flexible gunnery." That means the gunner swings his barrels around in any direction from which the enemy approaches. In the bomber the guns are purely for defense. Interceptor planes generally have their guns mounted in the fuselage or wings. Their business is to attack and the pilot points the whole plane to make that attack. The gunner's role in aerial combat was described in a speech by General H. H. Arnold in August, 1942: "In the bombers it's the combat crew that counts. The navigator gets them to the target; it's the bombardier who drops the bombs and determines the hits or misses made. It's the gunner who sits in the turret all cramped and tense with his eyes peeled in all directions watching for the enemy diving out of the sun. "It's the gunner sitting back in the tail who takes it on the chin when the Zeros come in. "It's the gunner, who may double in brass as an engineer or radioman, who dishes it out, dishes it out in a manner designed to keep the other fellow at a respectful distance. They are all members of a team. For a time only the pilot wore wings. Then wings were authorized for bombardiers and navigators. Now wings, air crew wings, are authorized for the other men of that combat team. Now the gunner has something to wear on his chest to proclaim he's a first-rate fighting man. He always has been appreciated by the Army Air Forces as such; now we are giving the man himself something to wear that will identify him as a "Gunner", a man to be honored and respected by all." This book attempts to tell part of the story of each man's activities here,- the comfortable living quarters, the soldierly routine, the recreational facilities, the opportunities for church going, good libraries for enlisted men and Officers and of course, the vital story of training to make the world's best aviators and to keep them aloft.

Hendricks Field - Army Air Forces Pilot School
Hendricks Field - Army Air Forces Pilot School
Detailed updates coming

Hunter Field - We're from Hunter Field, Georgia
Hunter Field - We're from Hunter Field, Georgia
History of Hunter Field ....... Hunter Field is not old in years, having been dedicated on February 19, 1941. The aggressiveness with which we have forged ahead since our founding and the ability gained through actual experience, has enabled us to improve constantly the methods of training given men stationed at this base. Located in Savannah, Georgia, Hunter Field is a vital unit of the important Third Air Force. The first important Army Air Base constructed under the defense program where the contractor worked on a fixed-fee basis, Hunter Field was "open for business" a short three months after ground was broken for the camp. The civilian airport already on the site was enlarged for military use and a small city sprang from the scrub pine surrounding the field. With this precedent for rapidly accomplishing assigned jobs, personnel of the field has continued to perform routine tasks of training with an efficiency rarely demonstrated at a base scarcely beyond the fledgling stage. Before it became an Army base, Hunter Field was named by the people of Savannah for a native son, Brigadier General Frank O'Driscoll Hunter, now commanding the Eighth Air Force Fighter Command in the European theatre. One of the World War I's foremost fighter pilots, his exploits earned for him the Distinguished Service Cross with four Oak Leaf Clusters. Not content to rest on his laurels, General Hunter has already received in this war, the Legion of Merit and the Silver Star for accomplishments and heroism. Many Air Fields have contributed greatly to the development of the Army Air Forces. We of Hunter Field have a pleasant memory to carry with us through life for it was here that the Eighth Air Force was born in the spring of 1942. Rapid expansion followed its activation and now the Eighth is playing a major role in the air battle waged over Europe. The superior methods of training employed at Hunter Field have been exemplified by many organizations now in combat areas. Typical is the story of a Bombardment Group formerly stationed here. From Hunter Field the outfit was sent to the Philippines before Pearl Harbor, one of the first bomb groups to go into action in the Pacific. Being without sufficient aircraft after severe losses, pilots, gunners, and mechanics alike discarded their flying togs and functioned as infantrymen. The founding of the Eighth, the courage and heroism demonstrated by individuals whose pre-battle experience at Hunter Field equipped them well for combat, and other more current accomplishments, bring the men of the base a certain pleasure, a pride in performing our duties well. Through the camera glimpses of the base contained in this booklet we hope to show various phases of our activities and to promote an understanding of the feelings we express verbally in "WE'RE FROM HUNTER FIELD."

Indiantown Gap - A Camera Trip Through Indiantown Gap
Indiantown Gap - A Camera Trip Through Indiantown Gap
Detailed updates coming

Jefferson Barracks Missouri - Meet Jeff Barracks
Jefferson Barracks Missouri - Meet Jeff Barracks
Detailed updates coming

Kelly Field - A Camera Trip Through Kelly Field - Texas
Kelly Field - A Camera Trip Through Kelly Field - Texas
The Story of Kelly Field ....... Kelly Field, until its conversion a few months ago, was one of the most famous pilot training schools in the United States. It was the "Mother of the Air Corps" to the courageous flyers who are now pounding the Fortress Europe into the ground. But on March 11, 1943, it ceased to function as a training center, merged with its neighbor, Duncan Field, and became an integral part of the Air Service Command. Its task changed overnight from training men to supplying and maintaining the planes those men have to fly. It is a tremendous task, but the military and civilian personnel working in the huge engineering shops, the depot supply warehouses and the offices of the Field are equal to the demands placed upon them in this state of acute emergency. They are working night and day to "Keep Them Flying." This book attempts to tell part of the story of each man's activities here: the comfortable living quarters, the soldierly routine, the recreational facilities, the opportunities for church going, good libraries for enlisted men and officers, and of course, the vital story of supplying the world's best Air Force and to keep them aloft.

Kessler Field Mississippi 1942
Kessler Field Mississippi 1942
From the very beginning, only one thing was expected of Keesler Field. That was a steady flow of highly trained airplane mechanics, men qualified for the important task of keeping this nation's warplanes in first-rate fighting condition. Today, as the world's largest Army Air Forces Technical School, Keesler Field has lived up to that expectation and established itself as a fitting memorial to the late 2nd Lt. Samuel R. Keesler of Greenwood, Miss., who died a hero in World War I, and for whom the Field was named. Keesler Field grew from an old golf course, ball park, airport, Naval Reserve Park and swampy woodland on the outskirts of Biloxi, Mississippi. Ground was first broken June 13, 1941, before war clouds burst over the Pacific. In February, less than eight months later, it made its first direct reply to the bombing of Pearl Harbor with the graduation of several hundred mechanics, the first to complete the intensive 19-week course in the AAFTS. Keesler's work did not end there, however. In addition to supplying thousands of mechanics, it teaches new men the basic fundamentals of warfare in its Replacement Training Center. Regardless of their duties here or overseas, the men of Keesler Field have the same goal in mind, they intend to "Keep 'Em Flying!"

Kessler Field Mississippi 1942 II
Kessler Field Mississippi 1942 II
From the very beginning, only one thing was expected of Keesler Field. That was a steady flow of highly trained airplane mechanics, men qualified for the important task of keeping this nation's warplanes in first-rate fighting condition. Today, as the world's largest Army Air Forces Technical School, Keesler Field has lived up to that expectation and established itself as a fitting memorial to the late 2nd Lt. Samuel R. Keesler of Greenwood, Miss., who died a hero in World War I, and for whom the Field was named. Keesler Field grew from an old golf course, ball park, airport, Naval Reserve Park and swampy woodland on the outskirts of Biloxi, Mississippi. Ground was first broken June 13, 1941, before war clouds burst over the Pacific. In February, less than eight months later, it made its first direct reply to the bombing of Pearl Harbor with the graduation of several hundred mechanics, the first to complete the intensive 19-week course in the AAFTS. Keesler's work did not end there, however. In addition to supplying thousands of mechanics, it teaches new men the basic fundamentals of warfare in its Replacement Training Center. Regardless of their duties here or overseas, the men of Keesler Field have the same goal in mind, they intend to "Keep 'Em Flying!"

Kingman Army Air Field - A Trip Through Kingman Army Air Field
Kingman Army Air Field - A Trip Through Kingman Army Air Field
A descriptive photographic story of activities and life around the air field.

Langley Field - A Camera Trip Through Langley Field
Langley Field - A Camera Trip Through Langley Field
Detailed updates coming

Laredo Army Air Field
Laredo Army Air Field
The gun totin', lead slingin', fancy booted bandito of the border is gone, but in his place and over the same ranges has grown up a new and deadlier aristocracy of death dispensers. For a long time, after the disappearance of the "old days," nothing was to be found on the wild areas around Laredo. Mesquite, Chapparel, sagebrush, and plenty of rattlers and jack-rabbits. However, when the United States became hard-pressed for aerial gunners; and it was evident that more schools would have to be opened, the Laredo area came into favor of its exceptionally good flying weather. When the site was selected in July of 1942, there was nothing on the barren ground, yet a few short months later, a factory had sprung up. A factory unique among a land of surprises. For here was taken raw material, from all corners of our land, all manner of men, trained in every conceivable trade; and in a few short weeks, they were turned into a homogenous group of deadly gunners and air crew members. In this volume will be found a pictorial record of the men and machines who make these changes, their ways of eating, living, and working and resting, and the way they take time out from their work. It is to these men, the officers and enlisted personnel of Laredo Army Air Field, and to the many students who have gone through and are going through now that this record is dedicated. They have made LAAF what it is and have every right to be proud of their work.

Las Vegas Army Air Field
Las Vegas Army Air Field
The Las Vegas Army Air Field, oldest aerial gunnery school in the world, spreads out over thousands of acres of arid desert north of Las Vegas, Nevada. Activated May 5, 1941, without precedent, this base was destined to train gunners who would make the Air Forces bombers the most deadly in the air, "four-motored fighters." With typical American ingenuity, the top officers of the gunnery school conceived new training theories, dreamed up synthetic devices which would simulate combat conditions, studied combat reports and applied their lessons to the brand-new curriculum. Stimulated to white heat by Pearl Harbor, the first class of student gunners graduated on January 24, 1942. First LVAAF graduate to become an international hero was M/Sgt. Meyer Levin, who was chief gunner for valiant Captain Colin Kelly. Since that time, over a hundred graduates have earned medals by the application of the lessons they learned at the Las Vegas Army Air Field. Said one alumnus in a letter to his former instructors: "I can say I owe my life to some of the things taught me fight there in Las Vegas." Las Vegas gunners "AIM WELL AND SHOOT STRAIGHT."

Laughlin Field - A Camera Trip Through Laughlin Field
Laughlin Field - A Camera Trip Through Laughlin Field
History of Laughlin Army Air Field ....... What was once a portion of one of Southwest Texas' largest ranches is now the site of the Army Air Forces' first pilot school for B-26 Marauders - the world's fastest medium bomber and one of the deadliest planes in combat. Construction of the field started in mid-1942 and the first men moved into barracks in late December of that year. Originally intended to be a school for bombardiers, the field was activated on October 29, 1942 as the Army Air Forces Bombardier School, Del Rio, Texas, with Lt. Col. E. W. Suarez commanding. Headquarters were first set up in offices at the United States Federal Building in Del Rio during October with a small number of officers, enlisted men and civilian employes assigned. Movement to the field was effected late in December. On December 26, 1942, command of the post was assumed by Col. George W. Mundy, the present commanding officer. Already selected as the first Marauder pilot school to be established in the world - on February 2, 1943, the field was re-designated the Army Air Forces Transition Flying School, Medium Bombardment, later to be changed to Army Air Forces Pilot School ( Specialized 2-Engine ), its designation today. Flying training started early in February, 1942, shortly after the arrival of Lt. Col. James E. Roberts, first Director of Training. Early in March, 1943, through the efforts largely of Colonel Mundy, the Commanding Officer, the pilot school was named Laughlin Army Air Field by the War Department. It was so named in honor of the late Lt. Jack Thomas Laughlin, of Del Rio, who was killed in action in the Far East on January 29, 1942. On March 28, 1943, impressive dedicatory ceremonies were held at which Maj. Gen. Gerald C. Brant, Commanding General of the Army Air Forces Gulf Coast Training Center, was principal speaker. The late Lieutenant Laughlin's widow, parents and daughter were honor guests. The field is now turning out large classes of expert Marauder pilots every nine weeks. Students at Laughlin Field are commissioned officers who have already earned their wings at advanced flying schools throughout the country. Their training at Laughlin Field consists of both flying and ground school.

Lincoln Army Air Base - Lincoln, Nebraska
Lincoln Army Air Base - Lincoln, Nebraska
Detailed updates coming

Livermore - NAS Livermore
Livermore - NAS Livermore
A descriptive photographic story of activities and life around the Naval Air Station.

MAAF - Midland Army Air Field
MAAF - Midland Army Air Field
Detailed updates coming

MacDill Field - MacDill Field Florida
MacDill Field - MacDill Field Florida
Detailed updates coming

Majors - A Camera Trip Through Majors Army Air Field
Majors - A Camera Trip Through Majors Army Air Field
Story of Majors Army Air Field ....... The following pages picture a tour through the environs of this new basic flying school of the Army Air Forces, Gulf Coast Training Center at Greenville, Texas. An attempt has also been made to show a small part of the multiple activities participated in by cadets, enlisted men and officers during the week's work. Primarily, the field, a theater of operations type, exists for only one purpose - that of training pilots to man the airplanes for Uncle Sam. The training of the cadet is intensive. He comes to Majors Field following pre-flight and primary schooling. He leaves here for advanced work, a commission and wings. The entire program is outlined for the well-being and happiness of the military personnel. From Sunday Saturday night it's a busy life, as these pictures will prove.

March Field - A Camera Trip Through March Field
March Field - A Camera Trip Through March Field
Detailed updates coming

Marfa Army Air Field
Marfa Army Air Field
History of Marfa Army Air Field ....... Marfa Army Air Field is located in the heart of West Texas' Big Bend country, between the Davis Mountains and the Rio Grande. Here, aviation cadets complete their pilot training and win the wings that make them eligible to fly multi-engined aircraft against the Axis. Here, young men from all states and territories of the Union begin their destiny as defenders of freedom. The Post was activated on August 15, 1942, and flying began on December 7, 1942, months ahead of schedule. Since that time the classes have grown larger and larger, indicating the ever-increasing momentum of America's war efforts. Recognizing the limited recreational facilities for the men who keep 'em flying, the Post has constantly stressed the development of these features. Construction of a theatre and spacious post exchange were the first moves in that direction. Later came service club, library, outdoor boxing arena, gymnasium, golf course, and bowling alleys. And the Post, now in its second year, continues advancing toward its goal as the best advanced two-engine pilot school in the world.

Maxwell Field, Alabama
Maxwell Field, Alabama
Maxwell Field, Alabama, one of the oldest of the Air Forces' many flying fields, was so named in honor of Second Lieutenant William C. Maxwell, an Alabamian, who met his death in an airplane accident while stationed in the Philippine Islands. The site of Maxwell Field was selected by Mr. Wilbur Wright for a flying school in 1910. Maxwell Field is the headquarters for the Army Air Forces Eastern Flying Training Command. Also located here is the Army Air Forces Preflight School ( Pilot ), where aviation cadets receive training in the school of the soldier and other ground school subjects. Just recently the Liberator Pilot Transition School has been added to Maxwell training facilities.

Maxwell Field, Alabama II
Maxwell Field, Alabama II
Maxwell Field, Alabama, one of the oldest of the Air Forces' many flying fields, was so named in honor of Second Lieutenant William C. Maxwell, an Alabamian, who met his death in an airplane accident while stationed in the Philippine Islands. The site of Maxwell Field was selected by Mr. Wilbur Wright for a flying school in 1910. Maxwell Field is the headquarters for the Army Air Forces Eastern Flying Training Command. Also located here is the Army Air Forces Preflight School ( Pilot ), where aviation cadets receive training in the school of the soldier and other ground school subjects. Just recently the Liberator Pilot Transition School has been added to Maxwell training facilities.

McClellan Field - A Camera Trip Through McClellan Field
McClellan Field - A Camera Trip Through McClellan Field
The History of McClellan Field - To the Military and civilian personnel of the Air Service Command at McClellan Field the famous phrase "Keep 'Em Flying" is no mere slogan. To them it is a religion. They MUST keep 'em flying! It is their job. To the pilots, the bombardiers, navigators and plane crews goes the glory - glory well earned indeed. But what of those thousands of valiant men and women on the ground who work untiringly day and night to keep those planes in the air? Is the part they play less glorious? Do you know what it takes to keep those ships in top flying condition? It takes an endless chain of supplies of gasoline, and tires and mechanical parts; it takes trained mechanics, electricians, metal workers, clerks and cooks. It is all part of the chain that reaches out from McClellan Field to every corner of the earth. For "the Air Service Command was created to service combat units of the Army Air Forces at all times and under any conditions, regardless of the difficulties encountered." The shops, the repair centers, the schools, the offices and training centers at McClellan are on a 24-hour basis that our planes may stay in the air - planes that tomorrow may bomb the tissue paper and bamboo cities of Tokyo and Yokohama or blast Hitler's lauded Luftwaffe from the air. McClellan Field and the Sacramento Air Depot is one of the outstanding military installations of its kind in the nation. Built a few miles north of Sacramento, it is ideally located for its purpose. Its shops and engineering sections can and do turn out repairs and equipment for the battle fronts of the Pacific and the world. But materials and repairs are not the only things this great Field turns out - it also turns out men. Thousands of soldiers are trained here. Aircraft and motor mechanics, radio men, administrative officers, clerks and technicians of almost every sort receive their schooling here. But this Field must not be looked upon as a mere training center. McClellan is in itself a battle front. Planes repaired or serviced here are often back fighting within a few days. It is this that brings to McClellan soldiers and civilian workers the feeling that they are doing their part. This book attempts to give you a few highlights of life at McClellan Field, especially from the soldier's angle. It pictures their work, their training and recreation. These soldiers and civilian workers are of all colors, creeds and ciasses. Mechanics and shopkeepers, farmers and laborers, lawyers and salesmen and men and women from- scores of other occupations work together in close harmony with but one thought, one purpose, that men shall once more live in a world free from want and free from fear. It is to these people - Americans all, military and civilians alike, that we dedicate this booklet that you may picture in your mind the part McClellan Field is playing in "KEEPING 'EM FLYING."

Mitchel Field - A Camera Trip Through Mitchel Field
Mitchel Field - A Camera Trip Through Mitchel Field
History of Mitchel Field ....... No older than the Air Corps as a flying field, Mitchel Field is carrying on the long military history of the land on which it is located. Guardian of New York City from aloft, Mitchel Field is filled with activity which is the modern repetition of war preparations made at Camp Winfield Scott during the War between the States, Camp Black during the Spanish-American War, and Camp Mills during World War I, for all those camps were located on the same level ground which is now Mitchel Field. The present installation dates from July 16, 1918, when it was named for Major John Purroy Mitchel, Air Service, Signal Reserve Corps, who was killed in an air accident at Gerster Field, La., on July 6, 1918. Major Mitchel had been mayor of New York City and a great advocate of aviation. The land for what is now Mitchel Field had been leased July 1, 1917 and was designated as an "Aeronautical General Supply Depot and Concentration Camp." The concentration camp meant that it was where supplies were concentrated, not the sinister meaning attached to the words today. Later the field was known as Field No. 2, Mineola, and operations began under the command of Lt. Col. Archie Miller, Air Service, Signal Corps. The new station served as a base for Hazelhurst, Lufberry, and Roosevelt fields, three airports clustered around what had been the Hempstead Plains acreage. Camp Mills was the training ground of the Rainbow (42nd) Division which included the "Fighting 69th." The land that was then Camp Mills is now Sub-Post No. 2 of Mitchel Field, and still colloquially known as Camp Mills. With the Armistice of 1918, the fate of Mitchel Field for a while was in doubt. Other flying fields in the vicinity were considered for permanent installations, but the General Staff selected Mitchel Field because of its great acreage and its opportunities for necessary expansion. Thus, in 1920 the land was bought by the government and designated as an active flying field. Mitchel Field was originally built to house a great number of men temporarily, while the needs of the Regular Army Air Corps was for a post to house a comparatively small number of men permanently. In 1924, the temporary buildings of 1917 were beginning to deteriorate, and preparations were made for conversion to a permanent post. The conversion was completed in 1932 with the Georgian style architecture which prevails in the residential buildings and barracks. Mitchel Field has been called one of the more beautiful Army posts in the country; and before the exigencies of war demanded, it was one of Long Island's favorite visiting places. Since war was declared, the Field has been closed to the general public. Officers who were on duty here in 1918 say that the two white birch trees on the parade ground are the only remaining landmarks, now visible, of World War I. Mitchel Field has been called the cradle of American military aviation. It has also figured in the application of aviation to civilian needs. It served as a base for Air Corps Reserve training during the summer months when its planes worked with the National Guard of neighboring states in training activities. The field has been the scene of many famous flights and first experiments. The first airplane jumping contest in the nation was held here October 12, 1923. Four contestants leaped from planes at 4,500 feet altitude and parachuted to within 400 feet of one another on the field less than 90 seconds apart. Army flyers started broadcasting successfully from planes at 4,000 altitude over a distance of 200 miles. This important landmark in the development of aviation was done at Mitchel Field in August, 1924, the result of a new method of broadcasting invented by a Lieutenant Connell on duty at Mitchel Field. Early in 1924 experiments were begun which resulted in establishment of air mail service on July 1, 1924. On July 4, 1924, Mitchel Field witnessed the greatest collection of fighting planes ever seen up to that time in the United States. When a squadron of Army flyers arrived at Mitchel Field on September 8, 1924, they completed a round-the-world flight which had begun on the Pacific Coast. Among the crowd assembled to meet their arrival was the Prince of Wales, now the Duke of Windsor, who had seen them as they passed through England. Lieutenant James H. Doolittle, now a major general, made the world's first "blind" landing in a flight at Mitchel Field September 21, 1929. The take-off, flight, and landing were made "under the hood" using only his instruments for guidance.

Moody Field - Georgia
Moody Field - Georgia
Hewn out of the tall pines and lowlands of Southern Georgia, which frame its environs, Moody Field, Army Air Forces Pilot School (Advanced 2 Engine), serves as an important cog in the Army Air Forces Eastern Flying Training Command. It is built on the site of the former T. J. Davis plantation, in Lowndes and Lanier counties, about twelve miles from Valdosta, Georgia. The field was named in honor of the late Major George Moody, a graduate of West Point in the class of 1929; who was a member of an acceptance board for twin-engine training aircraft at the time of his death. Ground breaking ceremonies took place in July, 1941, and by April, 1942, the first class of aviation cadets had completed the final phase of their flying training. They have been followed by a steady stream of other graduates who have earned their "wings" and gone out to combat commands. Here at Moody is a vital step in the battle of the skies, an epic long to be remembered by free men everywhere.

Moore Field - A Picture Book of Moore Field
Moore Field - A Picture Book of Moore Field
History of Moore Field - Moore Field is a single engine advanced flying school of the Army Air Forces, situated approximately 13 miles northwest of Mission, Texas, and less than 10 miles from the Rio Grande River and Mexico. In September, 1941, the work of clearing the cactus, mesquite and greasewood off the tract began, and shortly afterward the construction of runways, ramps, hangars, control towers, barracks and other buildings was under way. The first class of Aviation Cadets arrived late in February, 1942, and there was a new class every four-and-a-half weeks after that as the new school started turning out fighter pilots by the hundreds. The field was named in honor of Lieutenant Frank Murchison Moore, a native of Houston, Texas, who was killed while on a combat flying mission for the United States Army in France in 1918. The field is surrounded by uncleared brush land, but much of the land in this part of the Rio Grande Valley has been cleared and planted to citrus fruit, or vegetables, so that the Aviation Cadets and Student Officers see a checkerboard of alternating green and gray from their sleek AT6's as they fly their required hours. The field's principal purpose is to train fighter pilots, but the enlisted men stationed here to "Keep 'em Flying" have to keep fit themselves, and there is a full schedule of physical training, drill and weapons instruction for them. This book attempts to tell part of the story of each man's activities here: the comfortable living quarters, the soldierly routine, the recreational facilities, the opportunities for church going, good libraries for enlisted men and Officers and of course, the vital story of training to make the world's best aviators and to keep them aloft.

Napier Field Alabama
Napier Field Alabama
Napier Field is one of the many fields of the Southeast Training Center with headquarters at Maxwell Field, Ala. One week after Pearl Harbor, ( December 15, 1941 ) the first class of Cadets lifted their wings off the long runway of Napier Field six months ahead of schedule. The impetus of the emergency .... the industry of America . . . and the grace of the Almighty ... had literally presto-chango-ed" plowshares into silver wings. For Napier Field now one of the largest and most complete advanced flying schools in the Southeast Army Air Forces Training Center, was, in July of the same year, peaceful farmland covered with new peanut and cotton crops. Wartime censorship restricts information as to the size and cost of the field. Napier Field was named in honor of Major Edward L. Napier, a native of Union Springs, Alabama, who was in a crash of an Army airplane on September 15, 1923, while receiving training as a flight surgeon at McCook Field, Dayton Ohio. The Major had been a medical officer in World War I and had transferred to the Air Corps. The purpose of the field is to train cadets in all phases of advanced flying of single-motored planes ... night flying, formation flying, blind flying, gunnery practice, navigation and altitude flying. This field marks the final stage of a cadet's training, and it is here that he is awarded the coveted "Wings". American and British cadets receiving training here represent every state in the Union and practically every part of the empire on which "the sun never sets."

NATTC - Naval Air Technical Training Center - Memphis
NATTC - Naval Air Technical Training Center - Memphis
It was on the sultry Summer afternoon of June 17, 1942, that a small group of Naval officers broke ground for the project now known as the Naval Air Technical Training Center. A torrid Southern sun beat down on that desolate Shelby County weedpatch in a corner of West Tennessee as Lt. Comdr. Leonard Kirby, USNR, the station's first commanding officer, turned the first spadeful of dirt in soil where once the Army had taught pilots to fly for World War I. Almost miraculously thereafter, the station came into being, labeled for the moment the Naval Training School (Aviation Maintenance). Temporary headquarters were set up on the thirteenth floor of the towering Sterick Building overlooking the heart of downtown Memphis. An intensive campaign was launched to recruit the personnel for the ship's company. The enlistment drive met with instantaneous success. Construction likewise moved ahead with surprising speed. Indeed, so rapidly did the giant new naval activity take shape that its commissioning date was advanced to September 23, far ahead of schedule, and the training of Bluejackets in its three great schools was actually under way in early October. Lt. Comdr. Kirby gave way to a new commanding officer, Capt. Norman R. Hitchcock, USN, and took an important assignment in the farther waters of the turbulent South Pacific. Under Captain Hitchcock, the first graduates completed their courses in November and left to take places on Freedom's fighting fronts flung far across the Seven Seas. When Captain Hitchcock, himself already a veteran of the Pacific fray, received in turn the call that was to carry him across the Atlantic to still another combat zone, Commander A. R. Buehler, USN, stepped up to commanding officer from executive officer, a post he had held since his own transfer to shore duty from active participation in the original invasion of Africa. The months brought maturity to NATTC in a multitude of ways. New Bluejacket arrivals found a steady, comfortable, healthy station with an alert, industrious crew. The Marines began to land, as did the WAVES and the Marine Women Reservists, all quickly making niches for themselves in the life within the Center as they were absorbed into the major schoolsthe Aviation Machinists Mates' School, the Aviation Ordnancemen's School and the Aviation Radiomen's School. Its original conception and scope vastly enlarged as the exigencies of global warfare impelled an increased output of trained Naval personnel, the Naval Air Technical Training Center stands today as a little city, complete in itself, offering every facility to the Navy man, the WAVE or the Marine who happens to be stationed here. The Center's complement numbers well into five figures, its physical environment is both attractive and utilitarian, and it is doing a job of which the nation might well be boastful. Weekly, in graduating classes that run into the hundreds, it is sending efficient, determined air crews to man the planes with which the Navy is contributing its full share toward the winning of the war. That it will continue to do, until the forces that threaten civilization shall have been blasted from the surface of the earth.

New Orleans Army Air Base - Air Depot Training Station, New Orleans, La.
New Orleans Army Air Base - Air Depot Training Station, New Orleans, La.
Detailed updates coming

Norfolk Naval Air Station
Norfolk Naval Air Station
Eyes of the Fleet! ....... N. N. A. Station is a part of the Naval Shore establishment. Like many other Naval Air Stations, its primary mission is to provide facilities in support of the aircraft attached to the U. S. fleet. Our U. S. Naval Aviation was born on Nov. 14, 1910 within sight of this Station. On that occasion a Curtiss Company pilot successfully took off in a 50 horsepower land plane from a hastily built platform erected on the bow of the U. S. S. Birmingham. This demonstration which occured in Hampton Roads awakened the world to the possibilities of an air armada, both for offensive and defensive purposes. But the navy's interest in aircraft, dates back to Sept., 1908 when observers were appointed to witness Orville Wright's demonstration before a gathering of high government officials at Fort Meyer, Va. The Naval observers were enthusiastic about future of the airpiane and suggested that the aircraft be equipped with pontoons so as to increase its adaptability to Naval use. However, a skeptical officialdom and ar apathetic public failed to realize the potentialities of aviation as an adjunct to the fleet So in the early part of 1910 Captain W. S. Chambers, U. S. N., in whose honor a subsidiary field here is named, took up the cause for the "eyes of the fleet" after he amended aviation meets at Belmont, N. Y. and Baltimore, Md. It was Captain Chambers who made the arrangements for the flight from the Birmingham, a demonstration which shocked the skeptics out of their lethargies and gave birth to the world's most efficient and effective Naval Air Force.

Orlando Air Base
Orlando Air Base
Orlando Air Base is truly the "Base Beautiful in the City Beautiful. " Activated September 1, 1940, Orlando Air Base has been transformed from a marshy, barren semi-wasteland into a beautiful, palm-dotted air base with eye-appeal; from War Department blueprints into, a bustling, efficient and key unit of Third Air Force. When Colonel Thomas S. Voss, commandant until April 27, 1942, arrived in the Fall of 1940 to take command at the time of activation, Orlando Air Base was a dismal blotch of land located on the outskirts of picturesque Orlando. Water stood in swampy areas of the base-site; only a handful of native pines dotted the area, and sand and mud combined with construction operations and the barrenness to make the site of the base an eye-sore. Colonel Voss and Lieutenant Colonel Sam M. Brabson, executive officer, pushed the face-lifting work through to completion in the remarkable time of a year and half. Four inches of rich top-soil was spread over the entire area; Bermuda sprigs were imported by the millions to carpet the base with lawn grass; hundreds of graceful native palms from the St. John's River swamp thirty miles away were brought to the base and freely sprinkled over the area, flowers and shrubbery came forth from all Central Florida to abound in profusion now; sidewalks and paved streets were laid to round out the pattern. While the business of beautification was speeded along, the base matched that temp in its primary function, that of fusing men and machines into effective combat teams, ready to match skill and daring against Axis foes. Both tactical and training units, as well as the Fighter Command School, are stationed here at this teeming base. On April 27, 1942, Colonel Willis R. Taylor, Commandant of the Fighter Command School, assumed command of the base, relieving Colonel Voss, who was transferred to MacDill Field, Tampa, to command that Third Air Force unit.

Patuxent - Pictorial Patuxent
Patuxent - Pictorial Patuxent
From deep forest, on rolling farm land in St. Mary's County in Southern Maryland, the Navy has created the Naval Air Test Center where aircraft and aviation gear are tested. Long dreamed of by pilots and engineers of the Bureau of Aeronautics, the Test Center gives the Navy a place where all major testing is performed. Authorized only a few days after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the U. S. Naval Air Station, Patuxent River, Maryland, was started when ground was broken in March 1942. It was commissioned 1 April 1943. The station is situated on a 6800-acre tract of land at the mouth of the Patuxent River and boasts a nine-mile coastline along the river and the protected waters of Chesapeake Bay. It has three conveniently located seaplane basins. There are three huge runways, including one 10,000 feet long, and a fourth runway under construction, and large hangars, shops, laboratories and many supporting activities. In addition to serving as the Navy's Aviation Test Center, the air station is headquarters for the Atlantic Wing of the Naval Air Transport Service Command. Air Transport Squadrons, 1, 8, and 9, have been located here and Patuxent has served as the East Coast terminus for flights to England, Europe and South America. By direction of the Secretary of the Navy on 16 June 1945, the U. S. Naval Air Test Center was established at NAS, Patuxent River, Maryland to accomplish the program of tests, including coordination of supporting services and facilities. Testing the Navy's planes and aeronautical equipment is Patuxent River's mission. It is a task which all who have served here have assisted materially. This book, PICTORIAL PATUXENT, is a photographic record of Sailors, WAVES, Officers and civilians who helped win the war through their service here.

Pensacola - The Naval Air Training Bases Pensacola, Florida
Pensacola - The Naval Air Training Bases Pensacola, Florida
This Booklet contains the following brief histories of the Naval Air Training Bases of Pensacola, Florida during World War II ....... NAS Pensacola ....... Barin Field - Naval Auxiliary Air Station ....... Whiting Field - Naval Auxiliary Air Station ....... NAS Atlanta ....... Bronson Field - Naval Auxiliary Air Station ....... Ellyson Field - Naval Auxiliary Air Station ....... Saufley Field - Naval Auxiliary Air Station ....... Corry Field - Naval Auxiliary Air Station ....... October 1945

Perrin Field - A Camera Trip Through Perrin Field
Perrin Field - A Camera Trip Through Perrin Field
History of Perrin Field - July 4, 1941, plows and graders and mammoth trucks went to work in Grayson county, Texas, levelling the black soil into what was to become Perrin Field, the first Army Air Force basic flying school to be put into operation after the United States went to war. The first class of aviation cadets arrived at Perrin Field for training December 16, 194!, just a week after Japan bombed Pearl Harbor and threw the United States into ,war against the Axis. Named in honor of the Late Lieutenant Colonel Elmer D. Perrin, a native of Boerne, Texas, the field was dedicated with fitting ceremonies February 23, 1942. Since that time the fledgling station has been improved until now it is one of the outstanding basic flying fields of the southwest. Perrin Field's serious work of training aviation cadets is constant, and the men of Perrin Field carry out their various duties with an earnest purpose that comes from a realization that every job is a part of the national effort of fighting the war. But, in off hours, there is also time for play. The pictures on the pages that follow depict both the work and the play at this basic flying field. Honoree in the naming of Perrin Field is the late Lieutenant Colonel Elmer D. Perrin of Boerne, Texas. Born in Boerne, April 7, 1896, Colonel Perrin enlisted in the United States Army as a private during World War I and served in the 165th Depot Brigade, later transferring to the Aviation Section of the Signal Corps. Commissioned as a second lieutenant July 5, 1918, Colonel Perrin spent the remainder of his life in the interests of aviation. Rated as a command pilot and combat observer, Colonel Perrin was sent to Baltimore, Maryland, in October, 1939, for duty as assistant district supervisor for the Eastern Air Corps Procurement District, as well as Air Corps representative at the Glenn L. Martin Company. He died when an airplane crashed and burned during an acceptance test of a bomber June 21, 1941, near Baltimore.

Quonset Point - U. S. Naval Air Station Quonset Point, R. I.
Quonset Point - U. S. Naval Air Station Quonset Point, R. I.
A half-dozen officers and men ... a few frame buildings ... the framework of a seaplane hangar , that was the beginning of Quonset Naval Air Station, in the autumn of 1940. The station was a neutrality patrol base then. But manpower, machinery and materials worked miracles, and in the summer of 1941 Quonset was officially commissioned a Naval Air Station. Today Quonset is a bustling community of officers, men, Waves and civilian war workers. Here are modern buildings housing land and sea planes . . . machinery to keep them in fighting trim ... an infinite variety of supplies, services required to support the combat personnel of naval aviation. And on every side, new construction, points to continued growth. In this short span, Quonset has achieved a history rich in tradition. Wherever men of naval aviation battle for freedom, Quonset men are in the fight. News reports from battle areas pay tribute to their courage and devotion to duty. Naval aviation's great victories have not been gained lightly. Many have been won against great odds. Practice and more practice makes them possible. Here Quonset men train daily to make air combat tactics more perfect. Such training makes possible the skills that enable our fliers to chart the true course . . . maneuver their planes more skillfully than the enemy . . . shoot more accurately ... to win. Here officers, enlisted men and civilians work together to keep our aircraft in top fighting trim ... to make them more than a match for the best the enemy can offer. Their work makes it possible to say: "In all the world there is no finer naval aviation equipment than that used by men of Quonset." This book hopes to show, in a small way, how Quonset goes about the job of serving the fleet ... to present a pictured record of the famous fighting planes . . . the carriers from which they operate . . . the station that serves them. It is a record book for today . . . and a memory book for that tomorrow when Naval Aviation will have done its job and Peace is won.

Randolph Field - The West Point of the Air
Randolph Field - The West Point of the Air
Click on Image for History of Randolph Field

Randolph Field, Texas
Randolph Field, Texas
Randolph Field was named in memory of Captain William Randolph, Air Corps, a native of Austin, Texas, who lost his life in an airplane accident at Gorman, Texas, in 1928. Randolph Field was completed in 1931 and covers 2300 acres. It is the largest cog in the complex program that will train 30,000 full-fledged military pilots each year for Uncle Sam's Air Corps. The purpose of the field is to train the young men of America in the principles of military aviation. The entire course of training lasts about seven and a half months and comprises flying, academic and military training. Classes start every five weeks. After successful completion of Basic Training at Randolph Field the class is transferred to advanced flying schools for the "polishing up" process prior to receiving their wings.

Redistribution Station No. 2 - Miami Beach Florida
Redistribution Station No. 2 - Miami Beach Florida
Detailed updates coming

Richmond Army Air Base
Richmond Army Air Base
The Army Air Base was opened as a military installation on June 18, 1942. It was the first base to be fully camouflaged and built on a dispersed plan, and at present is the largest base under the First Air Force. The Byrd Airport, which is the municipal airport for the city of Richmond, is included in the reservation in its original location which it occupied before construction began. The Army Air Base is situated on consecrated soil eight miles east of the historic city of Richmond. Some of the bloodiest battles of the War between the States were fought on the ground now occupied by the Base, as all of this territory was the scene of the Battle of Seven Pines.

Sampson - U. S. Naval Training Station at Sampson, N.Y.
Sampson - U. S. Naval Training Station at Sampson, N.Y.
The desperate fighting tradition of the United State? Navy as founded by Yankee seamen on the decks of the USS BON HOMME RICHARD still lives in the hearts of American Bluejackets whose exploits in this war will be recorded indelibly on the pages of history. Alongside the names of John Paul Jones and James Lawrence will be inscribed those of Rear Admiral Daniel J. Callaghan and Commander Howard W. Gilmore. And history, too, will record along with the feats of early seamen who gained their apprenticeship before the mast, those of today's sailors who are receiving "their early apprenticeship at Naval Training Stations throughout the land. The U. S. Naval Training Station at Sampson, New York, has made, and is making tens of thousands of the millions of sailors who are and will be manning our rapidly expanding battle fleet. Here, boys and men, recent civilians, are being trained the traditions so ably upheld and carried out by Rear Admiral William T. Sampson, USN, in whose honor the Station was named. Rear Admiral Sampson, who was born in nearby Palmyra, New York, graduated from the Naval Academy at Annapolis in 1861. During the Civil War he commanded the U. S. Steamer DAI CHING on the Charleston blockade and later served on board the monitor PATAPASCO when it was blown up by a torpedo. He was commended for his conduct on that occasion. Rear Admiral Sampson served as Superintendent of the Naval Academy from 1866 until 1890 and was later Chief of the Bureau of Ordnance. As Commander of the North Atlantic Squadron at the outbreak of the Spanish-American War, he carried out the blockade of Cuba and the attack on San Juan. The Admiral's Chief-of-Staff characterized him as "One of the greatest characters of our Navy and one of the finest of our country. Sampson was a hero by nature, for nature made him great." With his reputation as their guide, the men who go through Sampson Naval Training Station will be belt able to take their places as real fighting men in the greatest struggle this country has ever made, not only; for the democratic principles that are its very core-lip but for its very life.

San Antonio Aviation Cadet Center - Acres of Cadets
San Antonio Aviation Cadet Center - Acres of Cadets
Detailed updates coming

Seymour Johnson Field, North Carolina
Seymour Johnson Field, North Carolina
History of the Field ....... It was summer of 1942 . . . America had rolled up its sleeves to deal with the Axis. In the heart of North Carolina's rich Wayne County, rows of wooden barracks blossomed amid the cotton and tobacco fields. The first contingent of officers and men who had arrived on May 20, 1942, from Chanute Field, Ill., parent school in the Technical Training Command, moved in. Soon, thousands of men were hard at work in new classrooms. Seymour Johnson Field, named after a naval flier killed while testing a combat plane, had been born. First commanding officer of the field was Brig. Sen. Walter J. Reed, then a colonel. In the spring of 1943 he was succeeded by Colonel Donald B. Smith, a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point and a command pilot. In October, 1943, Brigadier General Francis M. Brady, an overseas combat veteran, assumed command of the field. General Brady, a World War I flyer, has served in the Philippines, Java, Australia, China, Burma, India and England since the outbreak of the present conflict. In England, he was in command of American medium bomber forces. A glance at service records quickly discloses the diversity of the men who attend this Aircraft Mechanics School of the Army Air Forces Technical Training Command. The Cohens, Kellys, Johnsons, Kuboskis and Pattersons are all represented. Peoria, Elwood, Shreveport, Spokane and Brooklyn are also here. Lawyers, accountants, newspapermen and longshoremen, despite the extremes of their professions, are taking the same course. These men, in short, represent a cross-section of America

Sheppard Field - A Camera Trip Through Sheppard Field
Sheppard Field - A Camera Trip Through Sheppard Field
A 36 page photo booklet of a descriptive picture tour of Sheppard Field. Format 8-3/8" x 10-3/4"

Sheppard Field Texas In Pictures!
Sheppard Field Texas In Pictures!
A 36 page photo booklet of a picture tour of Sheppard Field. Format 8-3/8" x 7-1/4"

Sioux Falls Army Air Field Illustrated Letter
Sioux Falls Army Air Field Illustrated Letter
A 32 page picture book of Sioux Falls Army Air Field. Format 8" x 11"

Souther Field - Americus, Georgia
Souther Field - Americus, Georgia
History of Souther Field ....... The tract of Georgia land which, in two wars, has been one of the largest training schools in military aviation, was named in honor of Major Henry Souther, a pioneer in the development of airplane engines and close associate of General "Billy" Mitchell in the last war. The property was purchased by the citizens of Sumter County and deeded to the United States government in 1917. An airfield was constructed immediately, and scores of pilots trained here, during the war and immediately after. Important names in aviation can trace the beginning of their careers to Souther Field. Charles A. Lindbergh made his first solo flight here, and later purchased his first airplane, a "Jenny," at the government auctions following the war. Another bidder to take his first plane home with him was Colonel Robert Scott, author of "God Is My Co-Pilot," and dubbed the "one-man air force" in the American Volunteer Group in China. In 1928 Sumter County purchased the field from the government, and used it for peace-time activities. When the war clouds gathered again in Europe, Souther Field was again activated by the Graham Aviation Company, under contract to the government. The first class of Flying Cadets arrived in March, 1941, and since that time Souther Field has graduated more than 4000 pilots for both the Royal Air Force and United States Army Air Force. Capable today of training 600 students simultaneously, Souther Field continues to serve the nation, developing the pilots who today and tomorrow strike the blows for freedom against Germany and Japan, and will make the United States lead the war in aeronautical achievement in the years to follow.

Stockton Field - A Camera Trip Through Stockton Field
Stockton Field - A Camera Trip Through Stockton Field
History of Stockton Field ....... One rainy winter day, the U. S. Army Air Forces arrived in Stockton to take over a small flying field flanked by a lone adobe hangar. It was December 5, 1940, that the first troops which formed the nucleus of the Air Forces Advanced Flying School at Stockton Field disembarked from a convoy of army trucks. They slithered through the mud and hastily set up tent shelters and other essentials for what was to be an amphibious three months. Efforts to level the field and construct buildings for housing men and equipment progressed slowly under the rains, as machines bogged down in quagmires and rivulets of water literally swamped all attempts at improving facilities here. But by December 10, a headquarters was established and by January 2, 1941, 90 cadets and 25 second lieutenants had arrived. Flight instruction started on the same day with eight AT-6's. From that muddy start, Stockton Field has mushroomed into one of the largest advanced flying schools in the West Coast Training Center. It has acquired an air of permanence and stability that foreshadows a still greater growth to come. The men of Stockton Field have faced many problems: rain, tule fogs and now the pressure of a global war. But as their first commanding officer used to say, "Stockton Field always comes through - on schedule!" On January 11, 1941, the field was officially dedicated and a month later the former one-hangar municipal airport was designated by the War Department as Stockton Field. The first advanced flying school on the West Coast had become a reality, but the future still held many days of hard work. Five weeks after the arrival of the first class of cadets, the population of Stockton Field had been raised to the 1,300 mark with 177 officers. Three Air Corps squadrons were organized, the 68th Air Base group to operate the post and school and to furnish the principal officers and all the flying instructors, and the 80th and 81st School Squadrons to provide men to overhaul and maintain the planes. Once a start had been made, the job of making this an outstanding school in the Air Forces advanced rapidly. More planes arrived until a fleet of 62 ships stood on the stubby flight line. Carpenters, plumbers, electricians, craftsmen and artisans worked in unison to transform the once deserted airport into a "city of soldiers" with all the modern conveniences of a thriving metropolis. At the same time, flight instruction continued steadily until the first graduation was held here on March 14, 1941, when o class of 25 second lieutenants and 90 cadets received their diplomas, and thus became charter members of the great fraternity of air heroes of this war who call Stockton Field their alma mater. Still Stockton Field continued to grow. On April 28, 1941, it attained its full complement of commissioned officers, cadets, enlisted men and civilian employees. On November 5, twin-engined planes arrived from Barksdale, La., and courses in the operation of medium bombers were added to the curriculum. By the end of the year, aerial traffic had outgrown the original capacity of the field and an 800 by 3,600-foot runway, costing about $650,000, was completed, allowing eight times more traffic than when the school was established a year before. Today we find a vast training plant with some three-score buildings drawn up in neat, military lines, a huge fleet of slick planes, and a personnel of several thousand officers, cadets and enlisted men. In addition, Stockton Field has four satellite fields located in the general vicinity. Today, the shadows of hundreds of Uncle Sam's silver or blue and gold training planes pass near the homes of Stockton's more than 80,000 air-minded inhabitants at most any time of the day or night. Twenty-four hours a day Stockton Field plays its vital role in making the United States Army Air Forces the greatest in the world. The pictures in this book tell the story of a soldier's life at Stockton Field. The book tells part of each man's activities - whether he toils through the night with grease and oil to "keep 'em flying" or is one of the men who soar through the skies and do the flying. Between them there exists a strong, friendly bond. Each is just as important to the other as links in a sturdy chain. And this book is for them: the men who clean the ships, repair and check the motors, man the radios, report the weather and plan the curriculum for study and the fellows who leave here with wings to add a new roar to America's air armada.

Tarrant Field - A Photographic Tour Through Tarrant Field
Tarrant Field - A Photographic Tour Through Tarrant Field
Bombers without pilots and mechanics are of little more use than a gun without a soldier.- And so at Tarrant Field, a fully equipped, almost self-sufficient military community, takes an important place in Uncle Sam's man-power production line. The Field, like the gigantic Consolidated plant which lies opposite its double-X shaped runways, is a manufacturer. Its products are men who rank among the most highly skilled in the Army Air Forces, experts in all phases of the battle-tested and proven B-24 Liberators. Training of flyers is the field's No. 1 job. Part of the carefully planned system which is producing the world's top airmen in numbers believed impossible a year ago, the Field is an advanced school that gives flyers their first post graduate course. The Field, which was activated in mid-August, 1942, is not concerned with beginners. Its pupils own their prized pilots' wings when they arrive; all are commissioned officers. Their problem now is learn to herd the huge four-engined B-24 through the skies, which is like jumping from arithmetic to calculus. First training was started at the Field on Oct. 11, 1942. At the Fort Worth field, the flyer comes face to face, for the first time, with a real combat ship, the one he is destined to fly in battle. The transition is a huge one. In place of the relatively light twin-engine trainer he flew at the advanced school, he is now confronted with a 29-ton aerial dreadnought powered by super-charged motors of tremendous power. A glance at the instrument panel, a Rube Goldberg-like maze of gadgets, would in itself frighten a less courageous soul out of six months' growth. But in nine weeks at Tarrant Field the student officer learns all there is to know about flying this giant of the clouds. He spends 105 hours in the air, day and night, in good weather or bad, or over half as many air hours as he has accumulated in all his previous training. With only oceans to form the boundaries of his class room, he flies from coast to coast, learns to figure out his own navigation problems. The Field, which is building "first pilots" at the rate of one class each 4 1/2 weeks, also has achieved outstanding results in development of maintenance mechanics and aerial engineers. A ground school for enlisted men conducts a four-week course which, with actual experience on "the line," qualifies men as top-flight mechanics. The quality of these men is perhaps best attested by the fact that a larger percentage of the field's craft is in the air on training missions than at the majority of fields. The field is able to care for virtually all its needs, carry on all its functions within itself. Its Quartermaster division supplies enlisted personnel with food, clothing, and shelter. No problem of building or repair is beyond the engineering department. There is a complete station hospital, modern theatres, chapels, and athletic facilities. Each squadron, basic administration unit of the field, has its own day room equipped for varied recreation. Most of the Field's enlisted men, the majority of whom are specialists, not only keep the huge planes in the skies, but perform a wide variety of duties ranging from playing a piccolo in the band to repairing typewriters. It all adds up to trouble for the Axis.

Truax Army Air Field - Madison Wisconsin
Truax Army Air Field - Madison Wisconsin
Detailed updates coming

Tyndall Field - Army Air Forces Flexible Gunnery School
Tyndall Field - Army Air Forces Flexible Gunnery School
Detailed updates coming

Victorville Army Flying School - A Camera Trip Through Victorville Army Flying School
Victorville Army Flying School - A Camera Trip Through Victorville Army Flying School
Detailed updates coming

Waco Army Air Field - Camera Cavalcade Waco Army Air Field
Waco Army Air Field - Camera Cavalcade Waco Army Air Field
Once upon a time, several thousand cadets ago, the Waco Army Air Field was a vast expanse of farmland, and the only living things that got off the ground were the boll weevils which snagged free hops on the cotton as it grew up. That was until September 2, 1941, when McLennan county tax-payers approved a bond issue of $150,000 to implement the county's part of the deal which would build an army air field on that farmland. Major John T. Sprague, placed in charge of the project, soon shipped the boll weevils, they were earthbound anyway, and began work on the field. By May 4, 1942, the first routine training flight was made from the new runways, and the new airport was open for business, that of training cadets and crewmen for the Army Air Forces. The Commanding Officer's gold oakleaf soon changed color and then grew into an eagle, and it was Colonel Sprague who directed the destinies of the Post through that progressive first year just ended. Post Operations, the heart of the air field; weather, clearances, base flight and transient aircraft. Things have moved pretty smoothly all the way, and the thousands of pilots and groundmen who have been stationed at the WAAF at one time or another during their army careers have been well pleased with the life here. That life is pictured by this graphic survey of the WAAF from landing to takeoff, arrival to shipment. In the ensuing pages you will find a series of pictures by Post photographers which in future years will serve as a valuable souvenir of the time you spent in service at the Waco Army Air Field.




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